deixis

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deix·is

 (dīk′sĭs)
n.
The function of a deictic word in specifying its referent in a given context.

[Greek, display, demonstrative reference, from deiknunai, to show; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

deixis

(ˈdaɪksɪs)
n
(Grammar) grammar the use or reference of a deictic word
[C20: from Greek, from deiknunai to show]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deixis - the function of pointing or specifying from the perspective of a participant in an act of speech or writing; aspects of a communication whose interpretation depends on knowledge of the context in which the communication occurs
semantics - the study of language meaning
Translations
déixis

deixis

[ˈdaɪksɪs] Ndeixis f

deixis

n (Ling) → Deixis f
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References in periodicals archive ?
In sentence 1), the use of the near temporal deictic expression "now" ("aknun") accompanied with the back shifted tenses are signs of FID.
The reference origin of a deictic expression is the situational context, whereas an anaphor obtains its reference from co-text.
In contrast, by using the deictic expression there in line (e), Lucille can prompt her interlocutors to draw on information available in the present interactional context-specifically, information about the placement of the bedroom windows-to build a model of the overall spatial configuration of the storyworld.
The "seems" warns us that adult Pip' s testimony is based on somewhat hazy memories, and the deictic expression "At such a time" (line 4) allows for more latitude and inaccuracy than "then" or "at that time.
For deictic expressions, TID uses the pointing signs HERE and THERE and the signing space, the space surrounding the signer's body.
As far as the stylistic means of achieving the emphasis on the self are concerned, the artful use of deictic expressions represents a fundamental stylistic device used by the confessional poets.
The deictic shift allows readers to "see things virtually from the perspective of the character or narrator inside the text-world, and construct a rich context by resolving deictic expressions from that viewpoint" (47).
In this essay I show how marked patterns in the use of deictic expressions in literary texts (e.
In the final panel, USEK's Talal Wehbe will present a paper, in French, whose title might well be translated as "Proximal and distal deictic expressions in Gibran's 'Madman:' the cultural roots.
The deictic expressions such as "there", "once upon a time", "a king named Agamemnon or a hero named Odysseus" are meaningful, significant or interesting only to the Greeks or Europeans who share with their cultural perspectives.
deictic expressions ('this', that', 'now') and a few perspectival expressions such as 'enemy'.
This pleonasmic or reflexive connection between the text and the picture is present in most of the messages reviewed, even when no deictic expressions were used in the text.