deism

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Related to Deistical: Deisists

de·ism

 (dē′ĭz′əm, dā′-)
n.
A religious belief holding that God created the universe and established rationally comprehensible moral and natural laws but does not intervene in human affairs through miracles or supernatural revelation.

[French déisme, from Latin deus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

de′ist n.
de·is′tic adj.
de·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

deism

(ˈdiːɪzəm; ˈdeɪ-)
n
(Theology) belief in the existence of God based solely on natural reason, without reference to revelation. Compare theism
[C17: from French déisme, from Latin deus god]
ˈdeist n, adj
deˈistic, deˈistical adj
deˈistically adv

de•ism

(ˈdi ɪz əm)

n.
belief in the existence of a God on the evidence of reason and nature, with rejection of supernatural revelation.
[1675–85; < French déisme < Latin de(us) god + French -isme -ism]
de′ist, n.
de•is′tic, de•is′ti•cal, adj.
de•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

deism

the acknowledgment of the existence of a god upon the testimony of reason and of nature and its laws, and the rejection of the possibility of supernatural intervention in human affairs and of special revelation. — deist, n.deistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deism - the form of theological rationalism that believes in God on the basis of reason without reference to revelation
rationalism - the theological doctrine that human reason rather than divine revelation establishes religious truth
Translations
deismus
deisme
deism
deismi
דאיזם
deizam
deisme
deizm
deism
deism
自然神論

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm] Ndeísmo m

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm ˈdeɪɪzəm] ndéisme m

deism

nDeismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider an atheistic (ATP-)model of physical reality which denies the reality of a god, and a deistical (DTP-)model which affirms God as the Creator.
He begins by adducing Paine's Deistical claim in The Age of Reason of how all official religions base their authority on some sort of revelation.
revolutionary and deistical doctrines" and was not pleased (77).