deism

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de·ism

 (dē′ĭz′əm, dā′-)
n.
A religious belief holding that God created the universe and established rationally comprehensible moral and natural laws but does not intervene in human affairs through miracles or supernatural revelation.

[French déisme, from Latin deus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

de′ist n.
de·is′tic adj.
de·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

deism

(ˈdiːɪzəm; ˈdeɪ-)
n
(Theology) belief in the existence of God based solely on natural reason, without reference to revelation. Compare theism
[C17: from French déisme, from Latin deus god]
ˈdeist n, adj
deˈistic, deˈistical adj
deˈistically adv

de•ism

(ˈdi ɪz əm)

n.
belief in the existence of a God on the evidence of reason and nature, with rejection of supernatural revelation.
[1675–85; < French déisme < Latin de(us) god + French -isme -ism]
de′ist, n.
de•is′tic, de•is′ti•cal, adj.
de•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

deism

the acknowledgment of the existence of a god upon the testimony of reason and of nature and its laws, and the rejection of the possibility of supernatural intervention in human affairs and of special revelation. — deist, n.deistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deism - the form of theological rationalism that believes in God on the basis of reason without reference to revelation
rationalism - the theological doctrine that human reason rather than divine revelation establishes religious truth
Translations
deismus
deisme
deism
deismi
דאיזם
deizam
deisme
deizm
deism
deism
自然神論

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm] Ndeísmo m

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm ˈdeɪɪzəm] ndéisme m

deism

nDeismus m
References in classic literature ?
He derived the ideas, in fragmentary fashion, from Bolingbroke, who was an amateur Deist and optimist of the shallow eighteenth century type, and so far was Pope from understanding what he was doing that he was greatly disturbed when it was pointed out to him that the theology of the poem was Deistic rather than Christian [Footnote: The name Deist was applied rather generally in the eighteenth century to all persons who did not belong to some recognized Christian denomination.
It's as dependable as Oregon rain: In the weeks following our July 4 Independence Day celebration, people write in to declare that America's founders were not Christians and that they were just nature-loving deists.
Stewart claims that most and nearly all of the founders were deists who were closet pantheists and, functionally, atheists.
Specific essays and the volume as a whole argue that Baur is dependent in some way on the British Deists John Toland and Thomas Morgan, both of whom wrote over a century before Baur.
His discussion of the founders' own religious beliefs starts with the same balance and nuance, arguing that the "portrayal of the founders as religion-despising deists is as inaccurate as the claim that they were all born-again Christians.
The Wahhabis Seen Through European Eyes (1772-1830): Deists and Puritans of Islam
Blake, for one, attacked deists for this very reason.
Most religion in America now conforms to the requirements of modern, liberal government, and the "center," if it can be found, has shifted to something that in practice (if not in name) is close to what Jefferson had in mind for his Unitarians, or what he and his fellow deists tended to call "natural religion.
The goal, which I share with many atheists, and also many deists and thoughtful members of many of the newer liberal churches, is to clear the ideosphere of the harmful religion viruses that plague modern humankind.
This collection of essays explores the contributions of English Deists, particularly John Toland, to historical exegesis of the Bible.
At any rate, he does not rise above the religion of the Deists, of whom there are considerable numbers everywhere (so deplorable is the morality of our age), and especially in France.
Every one of the Founders listed in the following survey (with the possible exception of Benjamin Franklin) would reject such an appellation and in fact never referred to themselves as deists (again, with a passing reference to himself made by Franklin).