Delitable

Related to Delitable: delectable

De`lit´a`ble


a.1.Delightful; delectable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bipenke you whan ye semeden blisful & weren enuious, pore and weren riche, symple & weren myyti, deuoute and weren gloseris, holi and weren ypocritis, beggeris & weren proud, techeris of fablis, wipouten schame, vnstable martiris, delitable confessouris.
And moche the more and profitabler [INI] yf he be mery and glad, and yf he myght have reasonable glory and honoure, and of his enemyes victorye, hope and trust in the peple, in pleyes and sightes to delyte, to se faire faces and visages, and beholde delitable bokes, and to here swete songes and delitable, to laugh amonge tham that loven hym, to be clad in the best clothyng of colour and teyntour, and to be wele an-oynted with the best according oynementis to the tyme.
In the ROD section, the recommendations given are related to the person's humour, to the physical appearance and to some cultural aspects following the expected structure (to-infinitive of purpose) as to se faire faces and visages, and beholde delitable bookes, and to here swete songes and delitable, to be clad in the best clothyng of colour and teyntour.
Par cest example prengne esgart chascune et chascuns qu'il se gart de tenir oiseuse mesnie, et d'atraire en sa compaignie chose qui li soit damagable, com bien qu'il li soit delitable, quar veoir puet comme il meschut a cest riche home, qui dechut por les chiens oiseuz mantenir.
raisons, l'une ke nous somes en France, l'autre por cou que la parleure est plus delitable et plus commune a tous langages.
Ja mes de ceanz n'isterez / Ceste nuit vous covient morir / Dels iert de vostre char porrir / Qui si est bels et delitable [.
The first prologue leads into the story's setting, "And many another delitable sighte, / And Saluces this noble contree highte" (62-63); the second leads into the description of Grisilde, "A doghter hadde he, fair ynogh to sighte, / And Grisildis this yonge mayden highte" (209-10).
Instead, he encourages them to read this vernacular saint's life, which he describes, not as a generically different form, but rather a "deduit," a common term for pleasurable, courtly narrative, "qui mielz valt asez [which is worth much more]" and which is "plus delitable a oi'r [more delightful to hear].