delusion

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de·lu·sion

 (dĭ-lo͞o′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deluding.
b. The state of being deluded.
2.
a. A false belief or opinion: labored under the delusion that success was at hand.
b. Psychiatry A false belief or perception that is a manifestation of a mental illness: delusions of persecution.

[Middle English delusioun, from Latin dēlūsiō, dēlūsiōn-, from dēlūsus, past participle of dēlūdere, to delude; see delude.]

de·lu′sion·al adj.

delusion

(dɪˈluːʒən)
n
1. (Psychiatry) a mistaken or misleading opinion, idea, belief, etc: he has delusions of grandeur.
2. (Psychiatry) psychiatry a belief held in the face of evidence to the contrary, that is resistant to all reason. See also illusion, hallucination
3. (Psychiatry) the act of deluding or state of being deluded
deˈlusional, deˈlusionary adj
deˈlusive adj
deˈlusively adv
deˈlusiveness n
delusory adj

de•lu•sion

(dɪˈlu ʒən)

n.
1. an act or instance of deluding.
2. the state of being deluded.
3. a false belief or opinion: delusions of grandeur.
4. a false belief that is resistant to reason or confrontation with actual fact: a paranoid delusion.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin dēlūsiō; see delude, -tion]
de•lu′sion•al, de•lu′sion•ar′y, adj.

illusion

delusion

You can use either of these words to say that someone has a wrong belief.

They have the illusion that every contingency can be worked out in advance.
One patient had the delusion that he was Trotsky.

You say that someone is under an illusion or delusion.

Finally, I think he wanted me because he was under the illusion that I was loaded with money.
I still laboured under the nice middle-class delusion that everyone was a good guy at heart.

You can also say that someone suffers from an illusion or delusion.

A man who has had a leg amputated often suffers from the delusion that the leg is still there.

If you have an illusion of something, you believe that it exists when in fact it does not.

We have an illusion of freedom.
In return they are allowed the illusion of a guiltless life.
1. another meaning of 'illusion'

An illusion is also something that looks or sounds like one thing, but is either something else or is not there at all.

It might be an optical illusion but he actually seems to lift some horses in races when they are tired.
I fancy I can hear her voice, but that must be an illusion.

You do not use delusion with this meaning.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.delusion - (psychology) an erroneous belief that is held in the face of evidence to the contrarydelusion - (psychology) an erroneous belief that is held in the face of evidence to the contrary
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
mental condition, mental state, psychological condition, psychological state - (psychology) a mental condition in which the qualities of a state are relatively constant even though the state itself may be dynamic; "a manic state"
delusions of grandeur - a delusion (common in paranoia) that you are much greater and more powerful and influential than you really are
delusions of persecution - a delusion (common in paranoia) that others are out to get you and frustrate and embarrass you or inflict suffering on you; a complicated conspiracy is frequently imagined
hallucination - illusory perception; a common symptom of severe mental disorder
nihilistic delusion, nihilism - the delusion that things (or everything, including the self) do not exist; a sense that everything is unreal
somatic delusion - a delusion concerning the body image or parts of the body
zoanthropy - the delusion that you have assumed the form of an animal
2.delusion - a mistaken or unfounded opinion or idea; "he has delusions of competence"; "his dreams of vast wealth are a hallucination"
misconception - an incorrect conception
disorientation, freak out - a wild delusion (especially one induced by a hallucinogenic drug)
3.delusion - the act of deluding; deception by creating illusory ideas
dissimulation, deception, dissembling, deceit - the act of deceiving

delusion

delusion

noun
An erroneous perception of reality:
Translations
خِداع، غِشغرور
bludhalucinace
vrangforestilling
harhakuvitelma
hugarórar; ranghugmynd
blud

delusion

[dɪˈluːʒən] N (= false impression) → engaño m, error m; (= hope) → ilusión f (Psych) → delirio m
delusions of grandeurdelirios mpl de grandeza
to labour under a delusionabrigar una falsa ilusión
she's labouring under the delusion that she's going to get the jobabriga la falsa ilusión de que va a conseguir el puesto, se engaña pensando que va a conseguir el puesto

delusion

[dɪˈluːʒən] nillusion f
to be under the delusion that ... → croire naïvement que ...
to have delusions of grandeur, to suffer from delusions of grandeur → avoir la folie des grandeurs

delusion

nIllusion f, → Irrglaube m no pl; (Psych) → Wahnvorstellung f; to be or labour (Brit) or labor (US) under a delusionin einem Wahn leben; to have delusions of grandeurden Größenwahn haben

delusion

[dɪˈluːʒn] nillusione f (Psych) → fissazione f

delude

(diˈluːd) verb
to deceive or mislead (usually without actually telling lies). She deluded herself into thinking he cared for her.
deˈlusion (-ʒən) noun
a false belief, especially as a symptom of mental illness. The young man was suffering from delusions.

de·lu·sion

n. delirio, decepción, engaño; creencias falsas;
___ of control___ de control;
___ of grandeur___ de grandeza;
___ of negation___ de negación;
___ of persecution___ de persecución.

delusion

n delirio, falsa creencia patológica; delusions of grandeur delirios de grandeza
References in classic literature ?
Once this freakish, elvish cast came into the child's eyes while Hester was looking at her own image in them, as mothers are food of doing; and suddenly for women in solitude, and with troubled hearts, are pestered with unaccountable delusions she fancied that she beheld, not her own miniature portrait, but another face in the small black mirror of Pearl's eye.
It may be that the primal source of all those pictorial delusions will be found among the oldest Hindoo, Egyptian, and Grecian sculptures.
In short, then, he remained at home fifteen days very quietly without showing any signs of a desire to take up with his former delusions, and during this time he held lively discussions with his two gossips, the curate and the barber, on the point he maintained, that knights-errant were what the world stood most in need of, and that in him was to be accomplished the revival of knight-errantry.
Listening attentively, I recognized the words of the Resolution of the Council, enjoining the arrest, imprisonment, or execution of any one who should pervert the minds of the people by delusions, and by professing to have received revelations from another World.
But as soon as it was finished, the buzz was redoubled through all the drawing-rooms; the brilliant sums, the rolling millions which were to be at the command of the two young people, and which crowned the display of the wedding presents and the young lady's diamonds, which had been made in a room entirely appropriated for that purpose, had exercised to the full their delusions over the envious assembly.
And doctors actually support these advocates by affirming that there really is such a malady--that there really can arise temporary delusions which make a man remember nothing of a given deed, or only a half or a quarter of it
Just a month from this day, on September 20, 1850, I shall be sitting in this chair, in this study, at ten o'clock at night, longing to die, weary of incessant insight and foresight, without delusions and without hope.
These were freaks of imagination--nothing more, certainly-mere delusions, which I ought to be heartily ashamed of; but all through the Dark Valley I was tormented, and pestered, and dolefully bewildered with the same kind of waking dreams.
She laughed such delusions to scorn as Vogelstein tucked her beautiful furred coverlet--they reclined together a great deal in their elongated chairs--well over her feet.
He had no delusions about the respective merits of Gossett and himself as golfers.
Now and then I was able to persuade her almost to see light around her again; but she would soon fall, once more, into her old tormenting delusions, and would go so far as to reproach me for placing myself on a pedestal above her (I never had an idea of such a thing
Tell him for me that I have quite made up my mind, and that it is certain that a dangerous homicidal lunatic, with Napoleonic delusions, was in his house last night.