Demons


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Demons


one who denies the existence of the devil or demons.
recognition of the existence of demons and goblins.
a mania that causes a person to believe himself possessed and controlled by an evil spirit. Also cacodemonomania. — cacodemonic, cacodemoniac, adj.
1. a belief in the possibility of possession by a demon.
2. demoniac possession. Also demoniacism. — demonian, adj.demoniac, n., adj.
1. the belief in demons.
2. the worship of demons. Also demonolatry. — demonist, n.
1. the power of demons.
2. government or rule by demons. — demonocratic, adj.
demonology. — demonographer, n.
the worship, through propitiation, of ghosts, demons, and spirits. Also demonism.
1. the study of demons or superstitions about demons.
2. the doctrine of demons. Also demonography. — demonologist, n. — demonologic, demonological, adj.
Obsolete, forms of magie that require the invocation or assistance of demons.
a form of divination involving a demon or demons.
Obsolete, a person who is possessed by demons.
Obsolete, the sway or dominion of demons.
an abnormal fear of spirits and demons.
the working of magie with the aid of demons. — demonurgist, n.
qualities and doctrines that are diabolical. — devilish, adj.
a demoniac; a person possessed by an evil spirit. See also fads
1. the ceremony that seeks to expel an evil spirit from a person or place.
2. the act or process of exorcising. — exorcist, n.exorcismal, exorcisory, exorcistic, exorcistical, adj.
a demon alleged to lie upon people in their sleep and especially to tempt women to sexual relations. — incubi, n. pl.
1. an ecstatic variety of demonic possession believed by the ancients to be inspired by nymphs.
2. a frenzy of emotion, as for something unattainable. — nympholeptic, adj.
Rare. the worship of spirits dwelling in all forms of nature.
1. the abode of all demons; Heil.
2. any scène of wild confusion or disorder.
a devotion to a multitude of demonic powers or spirits. — polydemonistic, polydaemonistic, adj.
a demon that assumes a female form to tempt men to intercourse, especially appearing in their dreams. — succubi, succubae, n. pl.
References in classic literature ?
It seemed, for near a minute, as if the demons of hell had possessed themselves of the air about them, and were venting their savage humors in barbarous sounds.
In her lonesome cottage, by the seashore, thoughts visited her such as dared to enter no other dwelling in New England; shadowy guests, that would have been as perilous as demons to their entertainer, could they have been seen so much as knocking at her door.
And to ply them with that evil still, to keep up the work of demons, is what brings the others back.
He plays like one possessed by a demon, by a whole horde of demons.
There could not be fewer than five hundred people, and they were dancing like five thousand demons.
As they sat grouped about their spoil, in the scanty light afforded by the old man's lamp, he viewed them with a detestation and disgust, which could hardly have been greater, though they demons, marketing the corpse itself.
The yoke a man creates for himself by wrong-doing will breed hate in the kindliest nature; and the good-humoured, affectionate-hearted Godfrey Cass was fast becoming a bitter man, visited by cruel wishes, that seemed to enter, and depart, and enter again, like demons who had found in him a ready-garnished home.
Anthony had no harder fight with the ladies he was unpolite enough to call demons, than I in resisting the temptation to take another look at that pen-and-ink love making.
uf heard, in this strange interruption to his soliloquy, the voice of one of those demons, who, as the superstition of the times believed, beset the beds of dying men to distract their thoughts, and turn them from the meditations which concerned their eternal welfare.
He seemed under no apprehension, though he must have known that his life, among these treacherous demons, depended on a hair; and he rattled on to his patients as if he were paying an ordinary professional visit in a quiet English family.
The garnet cast out demons, and the hydropicus deprived the moon of her colour.
There are demons down there, quite black, standing in front of boilers, and they wield shovels and pitchforks and poke up fires and stir up flames and, if you come too near them, they frighten you by suddenly opening the red mouths of their furnaces.