morpheme

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Related to Derivational morpheme: Inflectional morpheme

mor·pheme

 (môr′fēm′)
n.
A meaningful linguistic unit that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts. The word man and the suffix -ed (as in walked) are morphemes.

[French morphème, blend of Greek morphē, form and French phonème, phoneme; see phoneme.]

mor·phem′ic adj.
mor·phem′i·cal·ly adv.

morpheme

(ˈmɔːfiːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics a speech element having a meaning or grammatical function that cannot be subdivided into further such elements
[C20: from French, from Greek morphē form, coined on the model of phoneme; see -eme]
morˈphemic adj
morˈphemically adv

mor•pheme

(ˈmɔr fim)

n.
any of the minimal grammatical units of a language, each constituting a word or meaningful part of a word that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts, as the, write, or the -ed of waited. Compare allomorph (def. 2).
[1895–1900; < French morphème; see morph-, -eme]
mor•phe′mic, adj.
mor•phe′mi•cal•ly, adv.

morpheme

A word or part of a word that cannot be further divided into smaller elements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morpheme - minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units
language unit, linguistic unit - one of the natural units into which linguistic messages can be analyzed
allomorph - a variant phonological representation of a morpheme; "the final sounds of `bets' and `beds' and `horses' and `oxen' are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme"
free form, free morpheme - a morpheme that can occur alone
bound form, bound morpheme - a morpheme that occurs only as part of a larger construction; eg an -s at the end of plural nouns
classifier - a word or morpheme used in some languages in certain contexts (such as counting) to indicate the semantic class to which the counted item belongs
ending, termination - the end of a word (a suffix or inflectional ending or final morpheme); "I don't like words that have -ism as an ending"
Translations
морфема
morfém
morfeemi
morfem
morféma
morfemaморфема
morfem
морфема

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] Nmorfema m

morpheme

nMorphem nt

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] nmorfema m
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as a derivational morpheme may be understood to be productive when it is used to produce new formations based on native items or borrowed lexemes, the use of a derivational marker for adaptation also gives a (limited) indication of the marker's productivity (see Dressler & Ladanyi 2000: 119-122, based on the the notions of primary/secondary productivity articulated in Wurzel 1989).
Nonfinites formed with the derivational morpheme -m- were observed with a special tense, which W.
It must not be forgotten, in this respect, that other genetically and areally related languages like modern German make use of a derivational morpheme that represents a reflex of bora.
It would be inconsistent, therefore, to analyze affixation, which adds an explicit derivational morpheme, in the Simplex Word as well as to deal with conversion, which lacks derivational marking, in the Complex Word.
This would lead, even more strongly, to a similar conclusion: the Layer I does not carry any case feature, since nominative base does not impose the selection of nominative Layer I morpheme, and there is no boundary between Layer I and II, but the same block is perceived as a single derivational morpheme.
As in other Semitic languages, the majority of verbs are built upon a triconsonantal root, each of which may yield one or more of six verbal stems: the G-stem or basic stem, the D-stem or transitivizing-denominative verbal stem, the C-stem or causative verbal stem, and the tG-, tD-, and tC-stems, to which a derivational morpheme, t-, was prefixed before the first root consonant.
3) When the derivative belongs in an inflectional paradigm, a further distinction must be established between the absence of any morpheme and the absence of any derivational morpheme while an inflectional morpheme is present.
1) Firstly, the explicit derivational relationship as in bacan 'to bake' ~baecestre 'baker', in which a full derivational morpheme turns up in the derivative, and, secondly, the implicit derivational relationship, such as the one holding in ri:dan 'to ride' ~ridda 'rider', in which no derivational morpheme is present from a strictly synchronic point of view.
Arguably, such constructions involve coordination of items that are expected to co-occur, and behave as a single conceptual unit with the derivational morpheme attached to it.
The results obtained from the analysis of the formal parameters of the prefixed verbs corroborate the morphological dualism of the prefix, which could serve both as a marker of the preterite participle and as a derivational morpheme.
The change of its syntactic category in this instance speaks in favour of treating {ing} as a derivational morpheme.