dervish

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Related to Dervishes: Whirling Dervishes

der·vish

 (dûr′vĭsh)
n.
1. A member of any of various Muslim ascetic orders, some of which perform whirling dances and vigorous chanting as acts of ecstatic devotion.
2. One that possesses abundant, often frenzied energy: "[She] is a dervish of unfocused energy, an accident about to happen" (Jane Gross).

[Turkish derviş, mendicant, from Persian darvēš, from Middle Persian driyōš, needy one, one who lives in holy mendicancy, from Old Iranian (Avestan) drigu-; akin to Sanskrit adhriguḥ (a divine epithet of unknown but favorable meaning) : perhaps a-, not + *dhrigu-, poor.]

dervish

(ˈdɜːvɪʃ)
n
(Islam) a member of any of various Muslim orders of ascetics, some of which (whirling dervishes) are noted for a frenzied, ecstatic, whirling dance
[C16: from Turkish: beggar, from Persian darvīsh mendicant monk]
ˈdervish-ˌlike adj

der•vish

(ˈdɜr vɪʃ)

n.
a member of any of various Muslim ascetic orders, some of which practice ecstatic dancing and whirling or chanting and shouting.
[1575–85; < Turkish < Persian]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dervish - an ascetic Muslim monkdervish - an ascetic Muslim monk; a member of an order noted for devotional exercises involving bodily movements
fakeer, fakir, faqir, faquir - a Muslim or Hindu mendicant monk who is regarded as a holy man
whirler, whirling dervish - a dervish whose actions include ecstatic dancing and whirling
Translations
dervis
derviş

dervish

[ˈdɜːvɪʃ] Nderviche mf (fig) → salvaje mf

dervish

nDerwisch m

dervish

[ˈdɜːvɪʃ] n (Rel) → derviscio
References in classic literature ?
In order to live a quieter life, the good man put on the robe of a dervish, and divided his house into a quantity of small cells, where he soon established a number of other dervishes.
The excuse he gave for his appearance was that he had come to consult the chief of the dervishes on a private matter of great importance.
But it would be quite simple for this holy chief of the dervishes to cure her if he only knew
The dervishes, who could not imagine what had become of him, were enchanted at his reappearance.
The Desert Dervishes," they would call themselves, and their chief songs would be those popular ditties, "In my Trailer," and "What Price Hair-pins Now?
They went there to flee vulgarity and extravagances, and to bathe and sit and talk and play with their children in peace, and the Desert Dervishes did not please them at all.
Ladies and gentlemen," they said, "we beg to present ourselves-- the Desert Dervishes.
There ain't a bob on the beach," said Grubb in an undertone, and the Desert Dervishes plied their bicycles with comic "business," that got a laugh from one very unsophisticated little boy.
There are stalwart Bedouins of the desert here, and stately Moors proud of a history that goes back to the night of time; and Jews whose fathers fled hither centuries upon centuries ago; and swarthy Riffians from the mountains--born cut-throats--and original, genuine Negroes as black as Moses; and howling dervishes and a hundred breeds of Arabs--all sorts and descriptions of people that are foreign and curious to look upon.
The men and women who live and move in that new world of his creation are as varied as life itself; they are kings and beggars, saints and lovers, great captains, poets, painters, musicians, priests and Popes, Jews, gipsies and dervishes, street-girls, princesses, dancers with the wicked [44] witchery of the daughter of Herodias, wives with the devotion of the wife of Brutus, joyous girls and malevolent grey-beards, statesmen, cavaliers, soldiers of humanity, tyrants and bigots, ancient sages and modern spiritualists, heretics, scholars, scoundrels, devotees, rabbis, persons of quality and men of low estate--men and women as multiform as nature or society has made them.
Besides these Dervishes, were other three who had rushed into another sect, which mended matters with a jargon about "the Centre of Truth:" holding that Man had got out of the Centre of Truth--which did not need much demonstration--but had not got out of the Circumference, and that he was to be kept from flying out of the Circumference, and was even to be shoved back into the Centre, by fasting and seeing of spirits.
Osman had a humanity so broad and deep that although his speech was so bold and free with the Koran as to disgust all the dervishes, yet was there never a poor outcast, eccentric, or insane man, some fool who had cut off his beard, or who had been mutilated under a vow, or had a pet madness in his brain, but fled at once to him; that great heart lay there so sunny and hospitable in the centre of the country, that it seemed as if the instinct of all sufferers drew them to his side.