Deuteronomist


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Deuteronomist

(ˌdjuːtəˈrɒnəmɪst)
n
(Bible) one of the writers of Deuteronomy
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the topics are riddles, words, and other instruments of illusion; the role and symbolism of the book's rhetorical architecture; death and cosmic warfare, and Judges and the Deuteronomist.
It is worth noting that this reading fits nicely with the cultic goals of the Deuteronomist author.
Specifically, they found four major time periods and four voices: the Yahwist from the kingdom of Judah, the Elohist from the kingdom of Israel, the Deuteronomist from the Reformist period and the Priestly from the Kohen period of exile.
There, one well-known problematization of the confident answer of the Deuteronomist storyteller to the problem of suffering is found in the Book of Job.
It is not for nothing that the Deuteronomist selects this location for Moses to say, "Choose life so that you and your descendents may live" (Deut.
There have been five authors identified in the production of these books: the Yahwist (J), the Elohist (E), the Priestly (P), the Deuteronomist (D), and the Redactor (R).
Romer examines the different perspectives on magic as found in Deuteronomy 18 and Exodus 7-9, understanding these two literary units as representative of the two great theologies of the Hebrew Bible--the Deuteronomist and Priestly theologies.
Now, we could do a number of things here, such as take a vote (two against and one for the taking of Jerusalem), or resort to sources and their problems, or read the contradiction as the hint to an alternative history of Israel, or read it as the trigger in the text for an allegorical interpretation, or as further signs of the dialogic voice of the Deuteronomist, or as the first marks of the tension between coherence and countercoherence, or perhaps even the beginnings of a Greimasian square in which the only option not covered is that Benjamin did indeed drive out the inhabitants of Jerusalem.
Did the Deuteronomist imagine that: bamah to be inside or outside the city walls?
The Deuteronomist taught that the proselyte-stranger (ger) was to be honored among the Jews, who had themselves been strangers (gerim) in Egypt (Deut.
But having reviewed the variety of ancient Near-Eastern genres dealing with the past, we are then offered detailed accounts of the historiographies of the Deuteronomist, the Yahwist, the Elohist and the Priestly writer(s) who, in their conventional chronological sequence (J,E,D,P) show a dissolution of the sacral character of monarchy.
The first half of the book is a long exegetical reflection on the politics of ancient Israel, as narrated through the Deuteronomist and prophetic literature of the Bible.