Deuteronomist

(redirected from Deuteronomistic History)
Related to Deuteronomistic History: Deuteronomic History

Deuteronomist

(ˌdjuːtəˈrɒnəmɪst)
n
(Bible) one of the writers of Deuteronomy
References in periodicals archive ?
Noll) address the Former Prophets, or the Deuteronomistic History, while the remaining six treat prophets and prophecy in Exodus (Bernon Lee), Chronicles (Paul S.
His topics are why the tribe of Benjamin matters, laying the groundwork: historical-critical and social-scientific methods, Chronicles and the Persian era, the tribe of Benjamin in history and literature, the tribe of Benjamin in the deuteronomistic history, the tribe of Benjamin in Chronicles, and the chronicler's "Benjamin" in Persian Yehud.
Past, Present, Future: The Deuteronomistic History and the Prophets (Leiden: Brill Academic Publications, 2000) p.
A significant detail recognized only by a few, for example, McKenzie, "Saul in the Deuteronomistic History," 67.
According to many scholars, this book is the beginning of the Deuteronomistic history, which continues through the end of 2 Kings.
The topics include the emergence and disappearance of the separation between the Pentateuch and the Deuteronomistic history in biblical studies, the empirical comparison and the analysis of the relationship of the Pentateuch and the Former Prophets, the cohesion and separation of books within the Enneateuch, reading Genesis 2-4 as a paradigmatic narrative, and possible literary connections between the Egyptian bondage in Exodus 1-15 and Solomon's forced labor in 1 Kings 1-12.
the many layers he proposes within and before the Deuteronomistic History in the Book of Kings).
Moore, God's Beauty Parlor: And Other Queer Spaces in and around the Bible, Stanford University Press, 200l; Ken Stone, Sex, Honor and Power in the Deuteronomistic History, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1996; essays in the collection Ken Stone, ed.
That is, he did not ascribe a systematic redaction of the Tetrateuch to a Deuteronomic author or redactor such as composed the Deuteronomistic History.
21) This period also saw the final editing of D as well as the deuteronomistic history, each of which utilizes notions of corporate responsibility.
Here Hundley discusses both the Deuteronomistic History (1 Kings 8) and P, with a lengthy treatment of the tabernacle dedication in P (Exodus 29, 40 and Leviticus 8-9).
The topics include idols in Isaiah in the light of Isaiah 10:10-11, Abraham and Cyrus in Isaiah 40-48, hope and disappointment: the Judahite critique of the exilic leadership in Isaiah 56-66, prophetic pornography revisited, some aspects of the monarchy in ancient Israel, on floods and the fall of Nineveh: a note on the origins of a spurious tradition, whether there is hope in the Deuteronomistic history, and being like the Cushites: some Western and African interpretations of Amos 9:7.