dialogical

di·a·log·ic

 (dī′ə-lŏj′ĭk) also di·a·log·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or written in dialogue.

di′a·log′i·cal·ly adv.

dialogical

(ˌdaɪəˈlɒdʒɪkəl)
adj
another word for dialogic
References in periodicals archive ?
Special emphasis is placed on a very good user experience (usability), a high level of accessibility, a powerful technical base and a very good technical accessibility, in order to afford dialogical reputation work / image building for Saxony and the government (online marketing) in good quality and at the same time acting as an official guide with an official and reliable form service.
Home and Migrant Identity in Dialogical Life Stories of Moroccan and Turkish Dutch
The dialogical self is a part of a web of relationships.
This study investigates the impact of implementing collaborative learning from a social and dialogical perspective on seventh graders' interaction in an English as a foreign language classroom at a public school in Bogota, Colombia.
Influenced by Dewey and Vygotsky, Lipman considers that CT occurs with, and is the result of, dialogical interactions with peers.
The final outcome of de Orta's investigation consists in this dialogical structured work, in which the reader is fully involved in this specific subject.
Teacher identity is conceptualized as a complex dynamic system (Byrne & Callaghan, 2014) and "being someone who teaches" is understood in dialogical terms as a process involving shifts between different and sometimes contradictory teacher voices (Akkerman & Meijer, 2011).
He also wishes to move away from abstract, formal theological discussion and toward a practical and dialogical method.
These dialogical excerpts stand out as a means of amplifying and validating essential aspects of the process involving human co-participation with God's promptings: an illustrative glimpse of the possible metacognitive-dialogical processes that may take place in the inner workings of the mind of a repentant person.
Chapters 3-5 analyze Lawrence's, Joyce's, and Woolf's presentations of dialogical consciousnesses respectively.
Notwithstanding his repudiation of Habermas, the dialogical ideal thus valorised by Flyvbjerg is manifestly intended to fulfil a very similar role in correcting for distorted power relations and thereby promoting judicious and equitable policy outcomes.
Building on James's (1890) idea of an extended self and Bakhtin's (1929/1973) metaphor of the polyphonic novel, a dialogical theory of counseling is exposed in which the self is considered as a minisociety of relatively autonomous I-positions that simultaneously function as part of the larger society.