Diaspora


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Di·as·po·ra

 (dī-ăs′pər-ə)
n.
1. The dispersion of Jews outside of Israel from the sixth century bc, when they were exiled to Babylonia, until the present time.
2. often diaspora The body of Jews or Jewish communities outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. diaspora
a. A dispersion of a people from their original homeland.
b. The community formed by such a people: "the glutinous dish known throughout the [West African] diaspora as ... fufu" (Jonell Nash).
4. diaspora A dispersion of an originally homogeneous entity, such as a language or culture: "the diaspora of English into several mutually incomprehensible languages" (Randolph Quirk).

[Greek diasporā, dispersion, from diaspeirein, to spread about : dia-, apart; see dia- + speirein, to sow, scatter; see sper- in Indo-European roots.]

di·as′po·ric, di·as′po·ral adj.

Diaspora

(daɪˈæspərə)
n
1. (Historical Terms)
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
2. (Peoples)
a. the dispersion of the Jews after the Babylonian and Roman conquests of Palestine
b. the Jewish communities outside Israel
c. the Jews living outside Israel
d. the extent of Jewish settlement outside Israel
3. (Bible) (in the New Testament) the body of Christians living outside Palestine
4. (Anthropology & Ethnology) (often not capital) a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
5. (Sociology) (often not capital) a dispersion or spreading, as of people originally belonging to one nation or having a common culture
6. (Peoples) Caribbean the descendants of Sub-Saharan African peoples living anywhere in the Western hemisphere
[C19: from Greek: a scattering, from diaspeirein to disperse, from dia- + speirein to scatter, sow; see spore]

Di•as•po•ra

(daɪˈæs pər ə)

n.
1. the scattering of the Jews to countries outside of Palestine after the Babylonian captivity.
2. (often l.c.) the body of Jews living in countries outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. such countries collectively.
4. (l.c.) any group migration or flight from a country or region; dispersion.
5. (l.c.) any group that has been dispersed outside its traditional homeland.
[1875–80; < Greek diasporá a dispersion, n. derivative of diaspeîrein to scatter. See dia-, spore]

Diaspora

the scattering of the Jews after the period of Babylonian exile.
See also: Judaism

diaspora

1. A Greek word meaning scattering, used to mean the dispersion of a people to other parts of the world, or the worldwide communities of a people, especially of the Jews.
2. The dispersion and exile of Jews, first by the destruction of the kingdom of Israel and of the kingdom of Judah and later by improved communications, commercial opportunities and especially the spread of the Roman Empire. Jews were scattered throughout Europe, Asia, and later North America. This dispersion was sometimes forced, such as in the exile to Babylon in 586 BC and at the destruction of the Temple by the Romans in AD 70.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diaspora - the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israeldiaspora - the body of Jews (or Jewish communities) outside Palestine or modern Israel
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
2.Diaspora - the dispersion of the Jews outside Israel; from the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in 587-86 BC when they were exiled to Babylonia up to the present time
dispersion, scattering - spreading widely or driving off
3.diaspora - the dispersion or spreading of something that was originally localized (as a people or language or culture)
dispersion, distribution - the spatial or geographic property of being scattered about over a range, area, or volume; "worldwide in distribution"; "the distribution of nerve fibers"; "in complementary distribution"
Translations

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] Ndiáspora f

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] ndiaspora f
the Irish diaspora → la diaspora irlandaise

diaspora

nDiaspora f

Diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] nDiaspora

diaspora

[daɪˈæspərə] n (frm) → diaspora
References in periodicals archive ?
During the course of the convention, JAMPRO will be engaging members of the Diaspora in discussion on the many trade and investment opportunities that currently exist in the island.
COLOMBO (CyHAN)- The Sri Lankan government on Tuesday defended the de-listing of several diaspora groups and individuals earlier accused of having links to terrorism.
The Diaspora vote remains to be the bone of contention considering SDSM' demand that Macedonia's expats be denied their right to elect their own legislators.
1, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- All roads are headed to The Netherlands as Rwandan diaspora in Europe arrive for what has become known as 'Rwanda Day.
Description : Diaspora organizations in Europe have increasingly gained in importance.
But as Daniel Boyarin writes in "A Traveling Homeland: The Babylonian Talmud as Diaspora", diaspora may be more constructively construed as a form of cultural hybridity or a mode of analysis.
The Diaspora voting will also be opened and BDI considers that we should have Diaspora voting in Macedonia.
Shifting the center of Black diaspora studies by considering Africa as constitutive of Black modernity rather than its forgotten past, the author argues that it is through the figure of romance that the possibility of diaspora is imagined across time and space.
South Sudanese diaspora are immigrants who escaped Sudan in search of refuge in the neighboring countries and across the globe.
Exploring global diasporas from both ecclesiological and missiological perspectives, it includes chapters that address the ethnic-specific concerns of global diaspora churches, as well as chapters that provide a broad overview of the phenomenon of global diasporas.
1) This migration of people is accompanied by an increased flow of ideas and communication, and one significant outcome of this is the rising influence of diaspora groups.
Endorsed by the Welsh Government, entrepreneur Walter May is exploring how Wales can better utilise its diaspora in the same way that the Republic of Ireland has been so successful in doing in recent years.