diatom

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Related to Diatoms: diatomaceous earth, Dinoflagellates

di·a·tom

 (dī′ə-tŏm′)
n.
Any of various microscopic one-celled or colonial heterokonts of the class Bacillariophyceae that are photosynthetic, have a silica cell wall made up of two interlocking parts, and form an important component of phytoplankton.

[New Latin diatoma, from Greek diatomos, cut in half, from diatemnein, to cut in half : dia-, dia- + temnein, to cut; see tem- in Indo-European roots.]

diatom

(ˈdaɪətəm; -ˌtɒm)
n
(Microbiology) any microscopic unicellular alga of the phylum Bacillariophyta, occurring in marine or fresh water singly or in colonies, each cell having a cell wall made of two halves and impregnated with silica. See also diatomite
[C19: from New Latin Diatoma (genus name), from Greek diatomos cut in two, from diatemnein to cut through, from dia- + temnein to cut]

di•a•tom

(ˈdaɪ ə təm, -ˌtɒm)

n.
any of numerous mostly marine algae of the class Bacillariophyceae (phylum Chrysophyta), each one-celled alga being enclosed in an intricately patterned double shell of silica, one shell fitting over the other like a box lid.
[1835–45; < New Latin Diatoma orig. a genus name, feminine n. based on Greek diátomos cut in two. See dia-, -tome]

di·a·tom

(dī′ə-tŏm′)
Any of various microscopic one-celled algae that live in water, have hard shells composed mostly of silica, and often live in colonies. Diatom shells are made of two symmetrical parts called valves.

diatomaceous (dī′ə-tə-mā′shəs) adjective
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diatom - microscopic unicellular marine or freshwater colonial alga having cell walls impregnated with silicadiatom - microscopic unicellular marine or freshwater colonial alga having cell walls impregnated with silica
phytoplankton - photosynthetic or plant constituent of plankton; mainly unicellular algae
alga, algae - primitive chlorophyll-containing mainly aquatic eukaryotic organisms lacking true stems and roots and leaves
Bacillariophyceae, class Bacillariophyceae, class Diatomophyceae, Diatomophyceae - marine and freshwater eukaryotic algae: diatoms
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The little spindle-shaped things in the centre are diatoms and may be disregarded since they are probably vegetable rather than animal.
While diatoms can be found in a variety of shapes, the ones used in the Diatomix product are shaped like barrels a configuration that has proven to be able to best hold an applied coating of titanium dioxide.
Request for Proposal: Technical assistance to support development of regional voucher flora for lake sediment diatoms in the northeast u.
Organic sources of nitrogen for marine centric diatoms.
15]N values in organics and prevailing fresh-brackish benthic diatoms indicate low enrichment in the shallow, freshwater lagoon during the period 1800-1955.
Among the biological variables, diatoms are considered the most successful among algae (Wehr and Descy, 1998) and are commonly used as indicators of water quality (Smol and Stoermer, 2010).
The data indicated that about 14,700 years ago, and again about 11,500 years ago, rapidly occurring warming of about 4-5[degrees]C in the Gulf of Alaska spurred an increase in marine plankton known as diatoms settling to the ocean's floor, which led to sudden oxygen loss in those locations.
It is curious to think that we can thank 30 million-year-old unicellular algae-like creatures called diatoms for the appealing appearance of such modern consumer goods as cooking oil, liquid soap, beer and wine.
Among the algae, diatoms have the advantage of being easy to collect and store due to their hard frustules.
In many countries, the monitoring of aquatic environments using biological communities is applied routinely (GROWNS, 1999; FORE; GRAFE, 2002), in which mainly the diatoms are being used in monitoring of rivers (KELLY et al.
Ultimately, bloom forming diatoms as many others microalgae (Turner, 2014) are able to produce an array of biologically-active metabolites, many of which have been attributed as a form of grazing deterrent (Turner, 2014 and references therein).