tonality

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to·nal·i·ty

 (tō-năl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. to·nal·i·ties
1. Music
a. A system or arrangement of seven tones built on a tonic key.
b. The arrangement of all the tones and chords of a composition in relation to a tonic.
2. The scheme or interrelation of the tones in a painting.

tonality

(təʊˈnælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Classical Music) music
a. the actual or implied presence of a musical key in a composition
b. the system of major and minor keys prevalent in Western music since the decline of modes. Compare atonality
2. (Art Terms) the overall scheme of colours and tones in a painting

to•nal•i•ty

(toʊˈnæl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1.
a. the sum of relations, melodic and harmonic, existing between the tones of a scale or musical system.
b. a particular scale or system of tones; a key.
2. (in painting, graphics, etc.) the system of tones or tints, or the color scheme, of a picture.
3. the quality of tones.
[1830–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tonality - any of 24 major or minor diatonic scales that provide the tonal framework for a piece of musictonality - any of 24 major or minor diatonic scales that provide the tonal framework for a piece of music
musical notation - (music) notation used by musicians
major key, major mode - a key whose harmony is based on the major scale
minor key, minor mode - a key based on the minor scale
home key, tonic key - the basic key in which a piece of music is written
atonalism, atonality - the absence of a key; alternative to the diatonic system

tonality

noun
A sound of distinct pitch and quality:
Translations

tonality

[təʊˈnælɪtɪ] Ntonalidad f

tonality

[təʊˈnæləti] ntonalité f

tonality

n (Mus) → Tonalität f; (of voice)Klang m; (of poem)Tonart f; (of painting)Farbkomposition f
References in periodicals archive ?
Through the 1980s and 1990s, composers responded to this by developing post-minimalism: music with minimalism's steady beat and diatonic tonality, but with ideas from many musical sources.
Both commentary and graphs show clearly that Schenker understood Brahms's compositional technique to be rooted firmly in diatonic tonality, and the materials on op.
1959), who has received increasing international attention for his compositions that integrate disparate stylistic elements, ranging from diatonic tonality and minimalism to serial ideas and electronics.