DDT

(redirected from Dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane)
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DDT

 (dē′dē-tē′)
n.
A contact insecticide, C14H9Cl5, occurring as colorless crystals or a whitish powder, toxic to humans and animals when swallowed or absorbed through the skin. Most uses have been banned in the United States since 1972.

[d(ichloro)d(iphenyl)t(richloroethane).]

DDT

n
(Elements & Compounds) dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane; a colourless odourless substance used as an insecticide. It is toxic to animals and is known to accumulate in the tissues. It is now banned in the UK

DDT

a toxic compound, C14H9Cl5, formerly widely used as an insecticide.
[d(ichloro)d(iphenyl)t(richloroethane)]

DDT

(dē′dē-tē′)
Short for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane. A powerful insecticide that is also poisonous to humans and animals. It remains active in the environment for many years and has been banned in the United States for most uses since 1972.

DDT

Dichloro-diphenol-trichloroethane. A pesticide with dangerous bioconcentration effects that is banned in much of the West, but still used in developing countries.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.DDT - an insecticide that is also toxic to animals and humansDDT - an insecticide that is also toxic to animals and humans; banned in the United States since 1972
pollutant - waste matter that contaminates the water or air or soil
insect powder, insecticide - a chemical used to kill insects
Translations

DDT

N ABBR =dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethaneDDT m

DDT

[ˌdiːdiːˈtiː] n abbr (=dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane) → DDT m

DDT®

abbr of dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane → DDT® nt

DDT

[ˌdiːdiːˈtiː] n abbr =dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethaneD.D.T. m

DDT

V. dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Velsicol, which made now-banned chemicals like polybrominated biphenyl, (PBB), and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane, (DDT), poisoned not just the local area but the entire state when a 1973 plant delivery screw-up contaminated cattle feed with fat-soluble flame retardant that was ingested by 9 out of 10 Michigan citizens.
It is often called DDT - meaning not dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane, the colourless, tasteless, odourless insecticide it should be, but the Department of Dirty Tricks," said Gandhi.
Army's Office of Malaria Control in War Areas began to use dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) to combat the mosquitos that carried malaria.