Dick-and-Jane

Dick-and-Jane

(dĭk′ənd-jān′)
adj.
Of or relating to a book for beginning readers using a small set of basic words that are frequently repeated.

[After Fun with Dick and Jane, and similar titles, children's readers by William S. Gray (1885-1960) and May Hill Arbuthnot (1884-1969).]
References in periodicals archive ?
Language that liberates, for Morrison, is the opposite of the kind of "master" and reductive discourse that appears in the Dick-and-Jane reader in The Bluest Eye and circulates in the language used by Schoolteacher in Beloved.
The novel has a double structure: On the one hand, there is the dominant codification of reality whose legitimacy is asserted through the Dick-and-Jane school primer, and on the other hand an alternative re-presentation of this rosy reality is developed through Pecola's story.
Peach's own experience as a critic of modern poetry is evident in his sensitive attention to language: both Morrison's use of language, to which he also addresses a separate chapter, and her implicit analysis - in the contrast between the Dick-and-Jane mythology and the Breedlove family in The Bluest Eye, for example - of "the way in which language is enmeshed with power structures" (38).
The effort required to do this and the damaging results of it are illustrated typographically in the repetition of the Dick-and-Jane story first without punctuation or capitalization, and then without punctuation, capitalization, or spacing.
Like the Dick-and-Jane story, Pauline's movies continuously present her with a life, again presumably ideal, which she does not now have and which she has little, if any, chance of ever enjoying in any capacity other than that of "the ideal servant" (101).