dick

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Related to Dicken: Dickensian

dick 1

 (dĭk)
n. Slang
A detective.

[Shortening and alteration of detective.]

dick 2

 (dĭk) Slang
n.
1. Vulgar A penis.
2. Vulgar A person, especially a man, regarded as mean or contemptible.
3. Chiefly British A fellow; a guy.
tr.v. dicked, dick·ing, dicks Vulgar
1. To have sexual intercourse with. Used of a man.
2. To treat (someone) meanly or unfairly; exploit or cheat. Often used with over.
Phrasal Verbs:
dick around Vulgar
1. To spend time idly; fool around.
2. To be sexually promiscuous. Used of men.
3. To exploit or cheat (someone).
dick up Vulgar
To botch or bungle.

[From Dick, nickname for Richard.]

dick

(dɪk)
n
chiefly US a slang word for detective
[C20: by shortening and alteration from detective; probably influenced by proper name Dick]

dick

(dɪk)
n
1. Brit a fellow or person
2. clever dick Brit a person who is obnoxiously opinionated or self-satisfied; know-all
3. a slang word for penis
[C16 (meaning: fellow): from the name Dick, familiar form of Richard, applied generally (like Jack) to any fellow, lad, etc; hence, C19: penis]
Usage: The third sense of this word was formerly considered to be taboo and it was labelled as such in older editions of Collins English Dictionary. However, it has now become acceptable in speech, although some older or more conservative people may object to its use

dick

(dɪk)

n.
1. Vulgar Slang. penis.
v.t.
2. Vulgar Slang. to have sexual intercourse with.
3. Slang. to victimize; cheat.
[1885–90]

dick

(dɪk)

n.
Slang. detective.
[1905–10; < Romani dik to look at, see < Hindi]

Dick

(dɪk)

n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dick - someone who is a detectivedick - someone who is a detective    
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
detective, police detective, tec, investigator - a police officer who investigates crimes
2.dick - obscene terms for penisdick - obscene terms for penis    
penis, phallus, member - the male organ of copulation (`member' is a euphemism)
dirty word, vulgarism, obscenity, smut, filth - an offensive or indecent word or phrase

dick

noun (Taboo slang) penis, cock (taboo slang), prick (taboo slang), member, tool (taboo slang), organ, wang (U.S. slang), knob (Brit. taboo slang), chopper (Brit. slang), plonker (slang), dong (slang), winkle (Brit. slang), joystick (slang), phallus, pecker (U.S. & Canad. taboo slang), John Thomas (taboo slang), weenie (U.S. slang), whang (U.S. slang), tadger (Brit. slang), schlong (U.S. slang), pizzle (archaic & dialect), willie or willy (Brit. informal) She remarked that most men think with their dicks, not their heads.

dick

noun
Slang. A person whose work is investigating crimes or obtaining hidden evidence or information:
Informal: eye.
Slang: gumshoe.
Translations
čurákšulin
pik
kaco
munntüra
kalukyrpämulkku
faszfaszfejpöcs
mentulapenisphallusverpa
pulă
snopp

dick

[dɪk] N
1. (US) → sabueso mf
2.polla f (Sp) , verga f

dick

[ˈdɪk] nbite f

dick

n
(inf: = detective) → Schnüffler(in) m(f) (inf); private dickPrivatdetektiv(in) m(f) ? clever Dick
(sl: = bastard) → Wichser m (sl)
(sl: = penis) → Schwanz m (sl)

dick

[dɪk] n (fam!) (penis) → cazzo (fam!)

dick

n (vulg, penis) pene m
References in classic literature ?
CHARLES DICKENS was a novelist who lived and wrote at the same time as Thackeray.
John Dickens, the father, was a clerk with a small salary in the Navy Pay Office, and his son Charles was born in 1812 at Portsea.
Things grew worse and worse however, and John Dickens, who was kind and careless, got into debt deeper and deeper.
But presently John Dickens got out of prison, Charles left the blacking factory, and once more went to school.
At fifteen Dickens left school and went into a lawyer's office, but he knew that he had learned very little at school, and now set himself to learn more.
People were no longer content with such make-believe reporting, and Dickens proved himself one of the smartest reporters there had ever been.
Besides reporting in the Houses of Parliament Dickens dashed about the country in post-chaises gathering news for his paper, writing by flickering candle-light while his carriage rushed along, at what seemed then the tremendous speed of fifteen miles an hour.
But even while Dickens was leading this hurried, busy life he found time to write other things besides newspaper reports, and little tales and sketches began to appear signed by Boz.
The sketches by Boz were well received, but real fame came to Dickens with the Pickwick Papers which he now began to write.
Like Jonson long before him, Dickens sees every man in his humor.
But when the fun is rather rough, we must remember that Dickens wrote of the England of seventy years ago and more, when life was rougher than it is now, and when people did not see that drinking was the sordid sin we know it to be now.
The glory of Charles Dickens," it has been said, "will always be in his Pickwick, his first, his best, his inimitable triumph.