Voltaire

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Vol·taire

 (vōl-târ′, vŏl-, vôl-tĕr′) Pen name of François Marie Arouet. 1694-1778.
French philosopher and writer whose works often attack injustice and intolerance. He wrote the satirical novel Candide (1759) and the Philosophical Dictionary (1764).

Voltaire

(vɒlˈtɛə; vəʊl-; French vɔltɛr)
n
(Biography) pseudonym of François Marie Arouet. 1694–1778, French writer, whose outspoken belief in religious, political, and social liberty made him the embodiment of the 18th-century Enlightenment. His major works include Lettres philosophiques (1734) and the satire Candide (1759). He also wrote plays, such as Zaïre (1732), poems, and scientific studies. He suffered several periods of banishment for his radical views
Volˈtairean, Volˈtairian adj, n

Vol•taire

(voʊlˈtɛər, vɒl-)

n.
(François Marie Arouet), 1694–1778, French writer and philosopher.
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Noun1.Voltaire - French writer who was the embodiment of 18th century Enlightenment (1694-1778)Voltaire - French writer who was the embodiment of 18th century Enlightenment (1694-1778)