dielectric

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di·e·lec·tric

 (dī′ĭ-lĕk′trĭk)
n.
A nonconductor of electricity, especially a substance with electrical conductivity of less than a millionth (10-6) of a siemens.


di′e·lec′tric adj.
di′e·lec′tri·cal·ly adv.

dielectric

(ˌdaɪɪˈlɛktrɪk)
n
1. (General Physics) a substance or medium that can sustain a static electric field within it
2. (General Physics) a substance or body of very low electrical conductivity; insulator
adj
(General Physics) of, concerned with, or having the properties of a dielectric
[from dia- + electric]
ˌdieˈlectrically adv

di•e•lec•tric

(ˌdaɪ ɪˈlɛk trɪk)

n.
1. a nonconductor of electricity; insulator.
2. a substance in which an electric field can be maintained with a minimum loss of power.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to a dielectric substance.
[1830–40; di-3 + electric]
di`e•lec′tri•cal•ly, adv.

di·e·lec·tric

(dī′ĭ-lĕk′trĭk)
Adjective
Having little or no ability to conduct electricity.
Noun
A dielectric substance, such as glass or rubber.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dielectric - a material such as glass or porcelain with negligible electrical or thermal conductivitydielectric - a material such as glass or porcelain with negligible electrical or thermal conductivity
bushing - an insulating liner in an opening through which conductors pass
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"
mineral wool, rock wool - a light fibrous material used as an insulator
glass wool - glass fibers spun and massed into bundles resembling wool
Translations
eriste
dielektrikum

dielectric

[ˌdaɪəˈlektrɪk]
A. ADJdieléctrico
B. Ndieléctrico m

dielectric

adjdielektrisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Standard features include X,Y,U,V linear motor drives with glass scale feedback, automatic dielectric level float switch, electrolysis free circuit, and a large 15" LCD monitor.
Where a vendor used to have three libraries per process (standard, high speed, and low power), they now may have seven or more libraries, including the original three, with each at multiple VT levels, multiple voltage supply levels, and sometimes multiple dielectric levels.