anorectic

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an·o·rec·tic

 (ăn′ə-rĕk′tĭk) also an·o·ret·ic (-rĕt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Marked by loss of appetite.
2. Suppressing or causing loss of appetite.
3. Of or affected with anorexia nervosa.
n.
1. One who is affected with anorexia nervosa.
2. An anorectic drug.

[From Greek anorektos, without appetite : an-, not; see a-1 + orektos, verbal adj. of oregein, to reach out for; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

an•o•rec•tic

(ˌæn əˈrɛk tɪk)

also an•o•ret•ic

(-ˈrɛt ɪk)

adj.
1. having no appetite.
2. affected with anorexia nervosa.
3. causing a loss of appetite.
n.
4. a substance, as a drug, causing loss of appetite.
5. an anorexic.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.anorectic - a person suffering from anorexia nervosaanorectic - a person suffering from anorexia nervosa
diseased person, sick person, sufferer - a person suffering from an illness
Adj.1.anorectic - suffering from anorexia nervosaanorectic - suffering from anorexia nervosa; pathologically thin
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare
2.anorectic - causing loss of appetite; "an anorectic (or anorexigenic) drug"
causative - producing an effect; "poverty as a causative factor in crime"
Translations
يُعاني مِن قِلَّة الشَّهِيَّة

anorexia

(ˌanəˈreksiə) noun
(also anorexia nervosa (-neː(r)ˈvousə) ) an abnormal fear of being fat that makes people, especially girls and young women, starve themselves. She suffers from anorexia and refuses to eat.
ˌanoˈrexic, ˌanoˈrectic adjective, noun
suffering from anorexia nervosa; a person who suffers from anorexia. Anorexics can endanger their lives; She looks so thin because she is anorectic.
References in periodicals archive ?
An independent panel of leading epidemiology experts, commissioned by the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, reviewed the study's results and determined its results were inconclusive because, among other things, the small number of reported cases and other intervening factors, such as alcohol and tobacco use by and pre-existing hypertension in the six stroke patients who reported a probable use of a PPA-based diet suppressant within three days of stroke onset.
But chemical appetite diet suppressants fell out of favor during the past decade, and so did these pills.