Dionysian


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Dionysian: Apollonian and Dionysian

Di·o·nys·i·an

 (dī′ə-nĭsh′ən, -nĭzh′ən, -nĭs′ē-ən)
adj.
1. Greek Mythology
a. Of or relating to Dionysus.
b. Of or devoted to the worship of Dionysus.
2. often dionysian Of an ecstatic, orgiastic, or irrational nature; frenzied or undisciplined: "remained the nearest to the instinctual, the irrational in music, and thus to the Dionysian spirit in art" (Musco Carner).
3. often dionysian In the philosophy of Nietzsche, of or displaying creative-intuitive power as opposed to critical-rational power.

[From Latin Dionȳsius, from Greek Dionūsios, from Dionūsos, Dionysus.]

Dionysian

(ˌdaɪəˈnɪzɪən)
adj
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to Dionysus
2. (Philosophy) (sometimes not capital) (in the philosophy of Nietzsche) of or relating to the set of creative qualities that encompasses spontaneity, irrationality, the rejection of discipline, etc
3. (often not capital) wild or orgiastic
4. of or relating to any of the historical characters named Dionysius
Compare (for senses 2, 3): Apollonian

Di•o•ny•sian

(ˌdaɪ əˈnɪʃ ən, -ˈnɪs i ən, -ˈnaɪ si-)

also Di•o•nys•i•ac

(-ˈnɪs iˌæk, -ˈnaɪ si-)

adj.
1. pertaining to Dionysus or his worship; Bacchic.
2. recklessly uninhibited; frenzied; orgiastic.
[1600–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Dionysian - of or relating to or worshipping Dionysus
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations

Dionysian

[ˌdaɪəˈnɪzɪən] ADJdionisiaco

Dionysian

adjdionysisch
References in classic literature ?
Haidee's learned reference is to the behavior of an actor in the Dionysian festivals.
Sculptor's other influences emerge from Romanian folk art traceable through Byzantine and Dionysian traditions.
Though the Apollonian has its place in Nietzschean thinking, the Dionysian cannot finally be resisted, and Kornhaber goes on to chart Nietzsche's disillusionment with virtually all aspects of modern theatre in the central section of his study.
In contrast the Dionysian represents music, mysticism, ecstasy, fusion with nature and community, dissolution of boundaries, and it is signified by intoxication.
The modernization should allow to offer the same level of service to all Dionysian regardless of his place of residence, and save the project aims to digitize patrimoine.
Put another way, the citizenry were no longer willing to open themselves to tragic conflict; they lost a sense for the Dionysian depths of the soul (psyche).
While the concept of beauty dominated the entire Kantian aesthetics of the critical period, the Dionysian has become the central principle of the late Nietzschean philosophy.
In July I went to a Dionysian wedding--our usual circle of family and friends take us into the oddest corners at times.
The pieces evoking Cypriot culture and history are Six Miniature Paintings by Nicos Vichas, Ups and Downs by Andreas Yangopouos, Naked Branches by Christina Athinodorou, Dionysian Dances by Christodoulos Georgiades and Cypriada by Andreas Kameris.
In this sense, he seems to adopt a distorted paternal right, with no moderation, towards his correspondent, signing his letter as a writing by death he orchestrates as a raver, under a condition of reversion from the religious to the mythical dimension, searching for the Dionysian signs.
What Nietzsche describes as the Apollonian, associated with clarity, consciousness, and control, bears evident affinities with Schopenhauer's account of representation, while what Nietzsche describes as the Dionysian, associated with chaotic energy, passion, and the collapse of distinctions, bears evident affinities with Schopenhauer's account of will.
At the time, Nietzsche was a professor of classical philology (the study of language in written historical sources); in The Birth of Tragedy, he contemplated the Apollonian and Dionysian elements of classical Athenian tragedy, viewing ancient plays as an art form that rose above the fundamental hopelessness, meaninglessness, and nihilism that surrounds life.