Diophantus


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Diophantus

(ˌdaɪəʊˈfæntəs)
n
(Biography) 3rd century ad, Greek mathematician, noted for his treatise on the theory of numbers, Arithmetica
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Noun1.Diophantus - Greek mathematician who was the first to try to develop an algebraic notation (3rd century)
References in classic literature ?
It appears too by his laws, that he intends to establish only a small state, as all the artificers are to belong to the public, and add nothing to the complement of citizens; but if all those who are to be employed in public works are to be the slaves of the public, it should be done in the same manner as it is at Epidamnum, and as Diophantus formerly regulated it at Athens.
Lewis Carroll, Hamilton, Lagrange, Euler, Descartes, Pascal, Fermat, Cardano, Fibonacci, Alcuin, Diophantus, Archimedes: for these great minds the "recreational mathematics" was not only for fun, but also a powerful source of inspiration.
It has attracted many of the most outstanding mathematicians in history including Euclid, Diophantus, Fermat, Legendre, Euler, Gauss, Dedekind, Jacobi, Eisenstein, Sieve of Eratosthenes and Hilbert all made immense contribution to its development.
The intermediate step between this and our modern symbolic notation was what is termed syncopated algebra, which was used by Diophantus, Hypatia and those who followed them for over one thousand years.
Something like 900 years passed by between the time of Pythagoras and the time of Diophantus who worked with what is now called Diophantine equations.
Some theoretical topics, such as number representation, rational and irrational numbers and prime numbers are covered before diving back into historical events: Euclid, Diophantus, ancient codes and the origin of cryptography are all described.
Diophantus studied sets of positive rational numbers with the same property, particularly he found the set of four positive rational numbers {1/16, 33/36, 17/4, 105/16}.
Diophantus of Alexandria was the first to look for such sets and it was in the case n = 1.
1) Notwithstanding the appearance in the work of Diophantus in the third century c.
He emphasizes two sets of problems named after Diophantus of Alexandria (fl.
The first instances of elliptic curves occur in the works of Diophantus and Fermat.
A number of problems and their solutions are transcribed, diagrammed, and annotated in detail, and an appendix offers a resume of similar examples from the (non-general) solutions of the third-century Diophantus of Alexandria.