Diplock court

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Diplock court

(ˈdɪplɒk)
n
(Law) in Northern Ireland, a court of law designed to try cases linked with terrorism. In order to prevent the intimidation of jurors, the court consists of a single judge and no jury
[C20: named after Lord Diplock, who introduced the courts in 1972]
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking after the verdict, he said: "I feel totally vindicated but there's a lot more people than me, on both sides of the divide, who went through those Diplock courts.
The Diplock courts system, as it became known, was brought in as an emergency measure in 1973.
D'Amato went so far as to call the Diplock courts "kangaroo
But the Diplock courts also carried important disadvantages: they
But the Liberal Democrats expressed scepticism over the pledge on Diplock courts, saying that experience of the controversial legislation had taught them to be "extremely cautious" over such promises.
His predecessor, David Blunkett, mooted the introduction of modern day versions of the Diplock courts used to try terror suspects in Northern Ireland without a jury.
As a judge in Northern Ireland he often presided over so-called Diplock courts, where major crimes are tried by judges alone and where the prosecution is given wide latitude in the use of paid informants.
But why is unionism afraid of the creation of an accountable, representative police service that is free from partisan political control or a criminal justice system free from Diplock courts and repressive legislation?
The idea was that this would help in the conviction of paramilitary suspects before Diplock courts.
Three commissions would be set up to look at the release of prisoners, reform of the Royal Ulster Constabulary and the Northern Ireland legal system, including the non-jury Diplock courts for terror offences.
The abrogation of jury trials in Northern Ireland through the creation of the Diplock courts in 1973 was one of the most fundamental encroachments on the protection of due process rights in the jurisdiction.
For a discussion of the Diplock Courts, see Douewee Korff, The Diplock Courts in Northern Ireland: A Fair Trial?