diplomatics

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dip·lo·mat·ics

 (dĭp′lə-măt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of paleography that deals with the study of old official documents and determines their age and authenticity.

diplomatics

(ˌdɪpləˈmætɪks)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (Library Science & Bibliography) the critical study of historical documents
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a less common word for diplomacy

diplomatics

the critical study of original historical documents, as registers, treaties, and charters, especially from medieval periods.
See also: Manuscripts
References in periodicals archive ?
A diplomatic edition of the oaths was published in five volumes by Polish historical linguists (Kowalewicz & Kuraszkiewicz 1959-1981).
In the following diplomatic edition, lineation, capitalization, and (lack of) punctuation are editorial; manuscript line boundaries are indicated by a vertical stroke (|); italics indicate the expansion of scribal abbreviations, including the Tironian note as and; and illegible or partly legible letters are enclosed in angled brackets.
The second section contains clear facsimile reproductions of the 88 double-sided leaves of thatch palm at about 50% of actual size, with a parallel diplomatic edition of the complete codex.
In the present publication we are given a facsimile reproduction of the original nipah-palm manuscript and a parallel diplomatic edition accompanied by paleographic and codicological remarks.
A diplomatic edition of the property records, including accents, is also provided.
Part II: Diplomatic Edition, with a Manuscript Description by Anne MacDonald.
Explication of such difficulties is no part of Mario Di Cesare's diplomatic edition of the Bodleian Manuscript.
The text of the first edition has been available to scholars since the beginning of the twentieth century in the cumbersome form of a diplomatic edition of the 1516 and 1521 printings by Filippo Ermini, published in 1909-11.
Thus, a particular letter may be meticulously presented in a photographic reprint, a diplomatic edition, a translation, and in a descriptive bibliography, yet, remarkably, we never learn why this letter is important.
Jean Klene (Tempe: MRTS, 1997); The Verse Miscellany of Constance Aston Fowler: A Diplomatic Edition, ed.
Perhaps Deborah Aldrich-Watson's The Verse Miscellany of Constance Aston Fowler: A Diplomatic Edition (2000) is the least interesting of the three works under consideration.