dipper


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Related to dipper: big dipper

Dip·per

 (dĭp′ər)
n.
1. The Big Dipper.
2. The Little Dipper.

dip·per

 (dĭp′ər)
n.
1. One that dips, especially a container for taking up water.
2. One of several small birds of the genus Cinclus that dive into swift-moving streams and feed along the bottom. Also called ouzel, water ouzel.

dipper

(ˈdɪpə)
n
1. (Cookery) a ladle used for dipping
2. (Animals) Also called: water ouzel any aquatic songbird of the genus Cinclus and family Cinclidae, esp C. cinclus. They inhabit fast-flowing streams and resemble large wrens
3. a slang word for pickpocket
4. a person or thing that dips, such as the mechanism for directing car headlights downwards
5. a small metal cup clipped onto a painter's palette for holding diluent or medium
6. (Historical Terms) archaic an Anabaptist

dip•per

(ˈdɪp ər)

n.
1. a cuplike container with a long handle, used for dipping.
2. Also called water ouzel. any small, stocky diving bird of the family Cinclidae, related to the thrushes, esp. Cinclus aquaticus of Europe and C. mexicanus of W North America, frequenting streams and rivers.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dipper - a ladle that has a cup with a long handledipper - a ladle that has a cup with a long handle
ladle - a spoon-shaped vessel with a long handle; frequently used to transfer liquids from one container to another
2.dipper - a cluster of seven stars in Ursa MinorDipper - a cluster of seven stars in Ursa Minor; at the end of the dipper's handle is Polaris
Little Bear, Ursa Minor - a constellation outside the zodiac that rotates around the North Star
North Star, polar star, Polaris, pole star, polestar - the brightest star in Ursa Minor; at the end of the handle of the Little Dipper; the northern axis of the earth points toward it
3.dipper - a group of seven bright stars in the constellation Ursa MajorDipper - a group of seven bright stars in the constellation Ursa Major
Great Bear, Ursa Major - a constellation outside the zodiac that rotates around the North Star
4.dipper - small North American diving duckdipper - small North American diving duck; males have bushy head plumage
duck - small wild or domesticated web-footed broad-billed swimming bird usually having a depressed body and short legs
Bucephala, genus Bucephala - buffleheads and goldeneyes
5.dipper - small stocky diving bird without webbed feetdipper - small stocky diving bird without webbed feet; frequents fast-flowing streams and feeds along the bottom
oscine, oscine bird - passerine bird having specialized vocal apparatus
Cinclidae, family Cinclidae - water ouzels
Cinclus aquaticus, European water ouzel - a water ouzel of Europe
American water ouzel, Cinclus mexicanus - a water ouzel of western North America
Translations
kauhakoskikara
waterspreeuw
gáo

dipper

1 [ˈdɪpəʳ] N (Orn) → mirlo m acuático

dipper

2 [ˈdɪpəʳ] N big dipper (at fair) → montaña f rusa
the Big Dipper (US) (Astron) → la Osa Mayor

dipper

3 [ˈdɪpəʳ] N (Culin) → cazo m, cucharón m

dipper

n
(= ladle)Schöpflöffel m, → Kelle f
(Tech, = person) → Eintaucher(in) m(f)
(Orn) → Taucher m, → Tauchente f
(Tech, = bulldozer) → Bagger m; (= scoop)Schaufel f
(at fair: also Big Dipper) → Achterbahn f
(Brit, Aut, for headlamps) → Abblendschalter m
(US Astron) the Big or Great/Little Dipperder Große/Kleine Wagen or Bär

dipper

[ˈdɪpəʳ] n (ladle) → mestolo (Zool) → merlo acquaiolo
References in classic literature ?
Only a little while back, when I was riding and suffering, what a heaven this peace, this rest, this sweet serenity in this secluded shady nook by this purling stream would have seemed, where I could keep perfectly comfortable all the time by pouring a dipper of water into my armor now and then; yet already I was getting dissatisfied; partly be- cause I could not light my pipe -- for, although I had long ago started a match factory, I had forgotten to bring matches with me -- and partly because we had nothing to eat.
I took all the coffee and sugar there was, and all the ammunition; I took the wadding; I took the bucket and gourd; I took a dipper and a tin cup, and my old saw and two blankets, and the skillet and the coffee-pot.
The teacher's desk and chair stood on a platform in one corner; there was an uncouth stove, never blackened oftener than once a year, a map of the United States, two blackboards, a ten-quart tin pail of water and long-handled dipper on a corner shelf, and wooden desks and benches for the scholars, who only numbered twenty in Rebecca's time.
When, having obtained permission, she walked to the water pail in the corner and drank from the dipper, unseen forces dragged Seesaw from his seat to go and drink after her.
Then he was battered to and fro as a rat is shaken by a dog--to and fro on the floor, up and down, and around in great circles, but his eyes were red and he held on as the body cart-whipped over the floor, upsetting the tin dipper and the soap dish and the flesh brush, and banged against the tin side of the bath.
In a sky of iron the points of the Dipper hung like icicles and Orion flashed his cold fires.
A leetle dipper," I heard the latter say, "and, perhaps, a few eenches - " but I lost the last epithet.
I wager my head against a dipper that you will have opened the door, rescued the girl, and despoiled the chief altar before a single beadle is awake.
The walls were black; there was an opening to admit the light above the worm-eaten door; and here and there were a few stools consisting of rough blocks of beech-wood, each set upon three wooden legs; a hutch for bread, a large wooden dipper, a bucket and some earthen milk-pans, a spinning-wheel on the top of the bread-hutch, and a few wicker mats for draining cheeses.
My furniture, part of which I made myself -- and the rest cost me nothing of which I have not rendered an account -- consisted of a bed, a table, a desk, three chairs, a looking-glass three inches in diameter, a pair of tongs and andirons, a kettle, a skillet, and a frying-pan, a dipper, a wash-bowl, two knives and forks, three plates, one cup, one spoon, a jug for oil, a jug for molasses, and a japanned lamp.
Still more delightful were the moments when they reached the stream where the rows ended, and the old man rubbed his scythe with the wet, thick grass, rinsed its blade in the fresh water of the stream, ladled out a little in a tin dipper, and offered Levin a drink.
There was a crowning air upon this closet of closets, of having been for ages hummed through by the Cathedral bell and organ, until those venerable bees had made sublimated honey of everything in store; and it was always observed that every dipper among the shelves