dis

(redirected from Disir)
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Related to Disir: Dagon, Nidhogg

Dis

 (dĭs)
n. Roman Mythology
1. The god of the underworld; Pluto.
2. The underworld.

[Latin Dīs, from variant of dīves, wealthy (from the belief that the underworld was the source of wealth from the ground); see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

dis

or diss  (dĭs)
tr.v. dissed, diss·ing, diss·es Informal
To show disrespect to, often by insult or criticism: "[The network] is often dissed for going after older, less demographically desirable viewers" (Michael McWilliams).

[African American Vernacular English, short for disrespect.]

dis

(dɪs)
vb
a variant spelling of diss

Dis

(dɪs)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Also called: Orcus or Pluto the Roman god of the underworld
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) the abode of the dead; underworld
Greek equivalent: Hades

dis

(dɪs)
v. dissed, dis•sing,
n. Slang. v.t.
1. to show disrespect for.
2. to belittle.
n.
3. disparagement; criticism.
[1980–85, Amer.; from dis-1 extracted from such words as disrespect and disparage]

Dis

(dɪs)

n.
the ruler of the underworld in ancient Roman belief.

dis-1

,
a prefix occurring orig. in loanwords from Latin with the meanings “apart, asunder” (disperse; dissociate; dissolve ); now frequent in French loanwords and English coinages having a privative, negative, or reversing force relative to the base noun, verb, or adjective: disability; disarm; disconnect; dishearten; dishonest; dislike; disobey.
Compare di-2, dif-.
[< Latin (akin to bis, Greek dís twice); often replacing des- < Old French]

dis-2

,
var. of di- 1 before s: dissyllable.

DIS

the Disney Channel (a cable television channel).

dis


Past participle: dised
Gerund: dising

Imperative
dis
dis
Present
I dis
you dis
he/she/it dises
we dis
you dis
they dis
Preterite
I dised
you dised
he/she/it dised
we dised
you dised
they dised
Present Continuous
I am dising
you are dising
he/she/it is dising
we are dising
you are dising
they are dising
Present Perfect
I have dised
you have dised
he/she/it has dised
we have dised
you have dised
they have dised
Past Continuous
I was dising
you were dising
he/she/it was dising
we were dising
you were dising
they were dising
Past Perfect
I had dised
you had dised
he/she/it had dised
we had dised
you had dised
they had dised
Future
I will dis
you will dis
he/she/it will dis
we will dis
you will dis
they will dis
Future Perfect
I will have dised
you will have dised
he/she/it will have dised
we will have dised
you will have dised
they will have dised
Future Continuous
I will be dising
you will be dising
he/she/it will be dising
we will be dising
you will be dising
they will be dising
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dising
you have been dising
he/she/it has been dising
we have been dising
you have been dising
they have been dising
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dising
you will have been dising
he/she/it will have been dising
we will have been dising
you will have been dising
they will have been dising
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dising
you had been dising
he/she/it had been dising
we had been dising
you had been dising
they had been dising
Conditional
I would dis
you would dis
he/she/it would dis
we would dis
you would dis
they would dis
Past Conditional
I would have dised
you would have dised
he/she/it would have dised
we would have dised
you would have dised
they would have dised
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dis - god of the underworld; counterpart of Greek Pluto
Translations
epäkunnioitushalveksintahalveksivastihaukkuakohdella

dis

, diss
vt (sl) to dis somebodyjdn blöd anreden (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
As commented on above, the original notion of elves seems to have been predominantly male, but on the other hand there was a class of female supernatural beings, the Old Norse disir, Old High German itisi, and Old English idesa, best known by the particular Old Norse traditions of valkyrjur and nornir (Grimm 401-2, 405, 417; Hall 22-3).
Del destrier sceso, a pena si ritenne di salir altri; ma tennel l'arnese: l'arnese il tenne, che bisogno trarre, e contra il suo disir messe le sbarre.
Jenny Jochens begins by demonstrating the continued interest in mythic-heroic figures in thirteenth-century Iceland, continues with a shorter section on divine females, goddesses, disir, fylgjur, valkyries and the like, and concludes with a longer section on women in the heroic material.