dismal science


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Related to dismal science: Dismal Swamp

dismal science

n
(Economics) the dismal science a name for economics coined by Thomas Carlyle
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Economics, once known as the dismal science, became the cheerful priesthood of win-win situations, emphasising the gains from international trade and free commerce and downplaying the fact that some benefited much more than others.
Kennedy School of Government, is the author of Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science.
He explains that Thomas Carlyle, in an 1849 publication calling for bringing back slavery, called economics the dismal science because the economists of the time strongly opposed slavery.
Economics, usually called the dismal science, is also the science of choice.
Contrary to commonly accepted accounts, the major expositors of the dismal science in the late 19th century were anything but apostles of Adam Smith or laissez-faire.
Buddhist Economics: An Enlightened Approach to the Dismal Science comes from an economist at UC Berkeley who also is a practicing Buddhist.
See Star Trek Economics: A Future Free of the Dismal Science and The Real-World Star Trek Would Be Far From Utopia)
Whilst economics is often called the dismal science, that is no excuse not to focus on the many positives being generated by businesses across Wales.
Whilst economics is often called the dismal science, that is no excuse not to focus on the many positives in the Welsh economy and the efforts made by the wealth creators and innovators working very hard every day to make this nation a better place.
Embarking here at the always uneasy intersection of philosophy and economic theory, Danish scholar Ole Bjerg has the chops for unpacking the dismal science, discussing economic concepts with flair and mostly avoiding stumbles into the dogmatic realm of the disciplines' competing languages and logics.
Alongside Harrison, Hunt, and Kelly's project were Allan Sekula's slide show Fish Story--Chapter 8: Dismal Science, 1989-92, and Sylvia Pankhurst's 1907 paintings of female boot makers and child laborers toiling under grim conditions.
He wrote in short, concise sentences that were easily understood--absolutely no trace of dismal science ever were to be found in his words.