dispositively

dispositively

(dɪsˈpɒzɪtɪvlɪ)
adv
obsolete in a dispositive manner
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than dispositively reject the Danish proposal noted above as strikingly at odds with the relatively clear language of Article 74(1), instead "there were doubts as to whether [it] was fully-compatible with the Statute.
Circuit Court of Appeals under federal constitutional guarantees would answer the question dispositively in that circuit, absent a contrary ruling from the U.
Brennan, however, demonstrates dispositively that Greene's "preoccupation with Catholicism and the tragicomic nature of the human condition" is the connective tissue of his corpus (136).
Just as historical precedent cannot prove dispositively that the funding ban on transferring Guantanamo detainees to the United States was constitutional, (178) neither does a lack of specific historical precedent necessarily render an exercise of Congress's purse power unconstitutional.
the sense that they dispositively determine, or prevent, particular
Still, hermeneutical questions remain, small and large, that perhaps cannot be dispositively answered.
Since then, New York courts have not dispositively defined what constitutes a sufficient connection to a public harm.
It has been presumed that even a few tumor cells in the node will dispositively change prognosis for the worse.
mandates--that dispositively end equivalents claims in favor of
98) Instead, a sense of directed and probably pre-destined decision making is what is at issue: the directors' decision was significantly, and perhaps dispositively, influenced by their relationship with the officers (or in some cases, the controlling shareholders who elected them).
Not only do decisions vary, but so do doctors and patients, and in ways that dispositively affect how they can, and want to, and should make decisions.