cognitive dissonance

(redirected from Dissonance theory)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

cognitive dissonance

n. Psychology
The psychological tension that occurs when one holds mutually exclusive beliefs or attitudes and that often motivates people to modify their thoughts or behaviors in order to reduce the tension.

cognitive dissonance

n
(Psychology) psychol an uncomfortable mental state resulting from conflicting cognitions; usually resolved by changing some of the cognitions

cog′nitive dis′sonance


n.
anxiety that results from simultaneously holding contradictory or incompatible attitudes, beliefs, or the like, as when one likes a person but disapproves of one of his or her habits.
Translations
kognitive Dissonanz
References in periodicals archive ?
We probably all remember cognitive dissonance theory from high school or college psychology class.
Specifically, cognitive dissonance theory makes several unnecessary assumptions about the source of additional value given to outcomes that require greater effort.
Cognitive dissonance theory (105) offers an explanation as to why some affected populations might perceive a tribunal as biased and unjust without considering whether it is actually biased and unjust.
Cognitive dissonance theory predicts that when individuals experience high levels of hypocritical dissonance between their behavior and their beliefs, they will feel strong psychological pressure to reduce that dissonance.
Cognitive dissonance theory holds that our reactions to these sorts of psychological stimuli tend to fall somewhere along a continuum on which each point represents a strategy for returning our consciousnesses into cognitive balance (Huegler, 2006; Van Overalle & Jordens, 2002).
According to cognitive dissonance theory (Festinger, 1957), one should work to reduce the dissonance and if it is too late to avoid the behavior, one would modify one's beliefs to account for or justify one's behavior.
In this package comprised of a facilitator's guide and 10 staple-bound participant workbooks, Stice (Oregon Research Institute) and Presnell (psychology, Southern Methodist University) outline a two-part group intervention program, based on cognitive dissonance theory, for adolescent and college-aged women at risk for developing eating disorders.
In tracing the development of cognitive dissonance theory, he addresses the motivational property of dissonance, shifting models and understandings of the role of the self in dissonance theory, and issues of culture and race.