dystopia

(redirected from Distopian)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

dys·to·pi·a

 (dĭs-tō′pē-ə)
n.
1. An imaginary place or state in which the condition of life is extremely bad, as from deprivation, oppression, or terror.
2. A work describing such a place or state: "dystopias such as Brave New World" (Times Literary Supplement).

dystopia

(dɪsˈtəʊpɪə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an imaginary place where everything is as bad as it can be
[C19 (coined by John Stuart Mill): from dys- + Utopia]
dysˈtopian adj, n

dys•to•pi•a

(dɪsˈtoʊ pi ə)

n., pl. -pi•as.
an imaginary society in which social or technological trends have culminated in a greatly diminished quality of life or degradation of values. Compare Utopia.
[1865–70; dys- + (U)topia]
dys•to′pi•an, adj.

dystopia

an imaginary place where the conditions and quality of life are unpleasant. The opposite of Utopia.
See also: Utopia
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dystopia - state in which the conditions of life are extremely bad as from deprivation or oppression or terror
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
utopia - ideally perfect state; especially in its social and political and moral aspects
2.dystopia - a work of fiction describing an imaginary place where life is extremely bad because of deprivation or oppression or terror
fiction - a literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact
Translations
DystopieGegenutopieMätopieAnti-Utopie
dystopia
distopia

dystopia

nDystopie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoover's style seems equally fit for a bleak documentary, suspenseful thriller, black comedy, distopian sci-fi nightmare, and grisly horror film.
What type of Disneyland accounting are they employing to promote this distopian vision of a future where the main facilities for the greater population are geographically removed to a site which is completely inaccessible during certain parts of the day?
The setting and the "science" are so well done that in spite of the cliches, fans of near-future distopian stories are going to eat this up.
While overtly determinist readings such as McLuhan's (19641994) "the medium is the message" are no longer the custom in Communication Studies, this emphasis on the material capabilities of technologies--often argued to lead to either a utopian or distopian outcome--remains (Ong, 1982; Rheingold, 1993; Negroponte, 1995).
Opening with a distopian vision of rising food prices, increased global warming, and further corporatization of the food supply set November 2020, Winne goes on to define frame the debate as one between an industrial food system headed by giant corporations and an alternative food system populated by those interested in systems of local, sustainable and healthy food.