do-rag

(redirected from Do-rags)

do-rag

also doo-rag  (do͞o′răg′)
n.
A scarf or kerchief worn as a head covering, often tied at the nape of the neck.

[do + rag.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
So it was business, not personal, when David Stern, former NBA commissioner, fearing the encroachment of hip-hop culture on the league, created a dress code for players that banned "fashions most often associated with hip-hop culture, specifically: jerseys, jeans, hats, do-rags, T-shirts, large jewelry, sneakers and Timberland style boots.
The groups often highlight the President and First Lady with features that are meant to be negative or funny such as beards, Afros, mustaches, gold teeth, do-rags and various costumes," Moody said.
Weary of seeing young men roll into class wearing do-rags, pajama bottoms or sagging pants, North Carolina Central University student body president Kent Williams Jr.
No caps, do-rags, bandanas, or hoods are permitted, except for items worn for religious reasons.
Impose dress codes on all students like the code of historically black Hampton University in Virginia, which instills "integrity, and an appreciation of values and ethics": no caps, hoods, do-rags, jackets, T-shirts or shorts in class, cafeteria or offices.
A few hard-looking young men, heads covered in do-rags, toned arms flexed and crossed over their chests, stared at the marchers.
The baggy jeans, hats, over-size jerseys, and do-rags favored by players like Allen Iverson of the Philadelphia 76ers are now off Limits when on team or league business.
The characters he sketched donned baggy jeans, do-rags, and gold medallions.
It won't be a hip-hop film with guys in do-rags because I'm always trying to break down people's perceptions and barriers.
In low-slung pants and do-rags, the members of Fly Dance Company draw stares as they enter to warm up for the evening's event, billed as a concert by the Midland-Odessa Symphony and Choral.
The sight must have been arresting for the former convict (the one-time drug dealer copped a plea at 19 after being arrested with half a kilo of cocaine), seeing some 12,000 chilangos singing his lyrics word for word while outfitted in New York Knick jerseys and do-rags.
Painted in fast, loose strokes, such scenes take sharp turns into the absurd: a boy mesmerized by the miracle of his own canoe-size sneakers, the appearance of sheep and a ghost against looming backdrops of public housing, not to mention the bizarre clash of nineteenth-century lace-up boots, bowler hats, and petticoats with contemporary do-rags and NBA gear.