doctrine

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doc·trine

 (dŏk′trĭn)
n.
1. A principle or body of principles presented for acceptance or belief, as by a religious, political, scientific, or philosophic group; dogma.
2. A rule or principle of law, especially when established by precedent.
3. A statement of official government policy, especially in foreign affairs and military strategy.
4. Archaic Something taught; a teaching.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin doctrīna, from doctor, teacher; see doctor.]

doctrine

(ˈdɒktrɪn)
n
1. (Philosophy) a creed or body of teachings of a religious, political, or philosophical group presented for acceptance or belief; dogma
2. a principle or body of principles that is taught or advocated
[C14: from Old French, from Latin doctrīna teaching, from doctor see doctor]
doctrinal adj
doctrinality n
docˈtrinally adv
ˈdoctrinism n
ˈdoctrinist n

doc•trine

(ˈdɒk trɪn)

n.
1. a particular principle, position, or policy taught or advocated, as of a religion.
2. a body or system of teachings relating to a particular subject: the doctrine of a Church.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin doctrīna teaching =doct(o)r doctor + -īna -ine3]

doctrine

Fundamental principles by which the military forces or elements thereof guide their actions in support of national objectives. It is authoritative but requires judgment in application. See also multinational doctrine; joint doctrine; multi-Service doctrine.

Doctrine

 a body or set of principles or tenets; doctors collectively.
Examples: doctrine of comets, 1754; of instruments [laws], 1594; of doctors—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.doctrine - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or schooldoctrine - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
nuclear deterrence - the military doctrine that an enemy will be deterred from using nuclear weapons as long as he can be destroyed as a consequence; "when two nations both resort to nuclear deterrence the consequence could be mutual destruction"
belief - any cognitive content held as true
Cabalism, Kabbalism - the doctrines of the Kabbalah
abolitionism - the doctrine that calls for the abolition of slavery
absolutism - the doctrine of an absolute being
amoralism - the doctrine that moral distinctions are invalid
animalism - the doctrine that human beings are purely animal in nature and lacking a spiritual nature
animism - the doctrine that all natural objects and the universe itself have souls; "animism is common among primitive peoples"
antiestablishmentarianism, antiestablishmentism - the doctrine of opposition to the social and political establishment
asceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual state
contextualism - any doctrine emphasizing the importance of the context in solving problems or establishing the meaning of terms
creationism - the literal belief in the account of Creation given in the Book of Genesis; "creationism denies the theory of evolution of species"
credo, creed - any system of principles or beliefs
divine right, divine right of kings - the doctrine that kings derive their right to rule directly from God and are not accountable to their subjects; rebellion is the worst of political crimes; "the doctrine of the divine right of kings was enunciated by the Stuarts in Britain in the 16th century"
dogma - a doctrine or code of beliefs accepted as authoritative; "he believed all the Marxist dogma"
dualism - the doctrine that reality consists of two basic opposing elements, often taken to be mind and matter (or mind and body), or good and evil
dynamism - any of the various theories or doctrines or philosophical systems that attempt to explain the phenomena of the universe in terms of some immanent force or energy
epicureanism - a doctrine of hedonism that was defended by several ancient Greek philosophers
establishmentarianism, establishmentism - the doctrine of supporting the social or political establishment
ethicism - a doctrine that ethics and ethical ideas are valid and important; "his ethicism often led him to moralize"
expansionism - the doctrine of expanding the territory or the economic influence of a country
formalism - the doctrine that formal structure rather than content is what should be represented
functionalism - any doctrine that stresses utility or purpose
Girondism - the doctrine of the Girondists
gospel - a doctrine that is believed to be of great importance; "Newton's writings were gospel for those who followed"
gymnosophy - the doctrine of a sect of Hindu philosophers who practiced nudity and asceticism and meditation
imitation - the doctrine that representations of nature or human behavior should be accurate imitations
laissez faire, individualism - the doctrine that government should not interfere in commercial affairs
internationalism - the doctrine that nations should cooperate because their common interests are more important than their differences
unilateralism - the doctrine that nations should conduct their foreign affairs individualistically without the advice or involvement of other nations
irredentism, irridentism - the doctrine that irredenta should be controlled by the country to which they are ethnically or historically related
literalism - the doctrine of realistic (literal) portrayal in art or literature
majority rule, democracy - the doctrine that the numerical majority of an organized group can make decisions binding on the whole group
monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
multiculturalism - the doctrine that several different cultures (rather than one national culture) can coexist peacefully and equitably in a single country
nationalism - the doctrine that your national culture and interests are superior to any other
nationalism - the doctrine that nations should act independently (rather than collectively) to attain their goals
nihilism - a revolutionary doctrine that advocates destruction of the social system for its own sake
pacificism, pacifism, passivism - the doctrine that all violence is unjustifiable
pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
populism - the political doctrine that supports the rights and powers of the common people in their struggle with the privileged elite
presentism - the doctrine that the Scripture prophecies of the Apocalypse (as in the Book of Revelations) are presently in the course of being fulfilled
freethinking, rationalism - the doctrine that reason is the right basis for regulating conduct

doctrine

noun teaching, principle, belief, opinion, article, concept, conviction, canon, creed, dogma, tenet, precept, article of faith the Marxist doctrine of perpetual revolution

doctrine

noun
A principle taught or advanced for belief, as by a religious or philosophical group:
Translations
مَذْهَب
doktrína
doktrin
doktriinioppi
tantantételvallási dogma
kenning; kenningakerfi
doktrinateorija
doktrīna, mācība
doktrína

doctrine

[ˈdɒktrɪn] Ndoctrina f

doctrine

[ˈdɒktrɪn] n
(= belief) → doctrine f
the doctrine of → la doctrine de
the doctrine that ... → la doctrine selon laquelle ...
(US) (= government policy) → politique f

doctrine

nDoktrin f, → Lehre f

doctrine

[ˈdɒktrɪn] ndottrina

doctrine

(ˈdoktrin) noun
a belief or set of beliefs which is taught. religious doctrines.
References in classic literature ?
He is of the same class as Callicles in the Gorgias, but of a different variety; the immoral and sophistical doctrines of Callicles are not attributed to him.
Ryde insisted strongly on the doctrines of the Reformation, visited his flock a great deal in their own homes, and was severe in rebuking the aberrations of the flesh--put a stop, indeed, to the Christmas rounds of the church singers, as promoting drunkenness and too light a handling of sacred things.
I find a similar base tone in the popular religious works of the day and the same doctrines assumed by the literary men when occasionally they treat the related topics.
But not to speak of the intrinsic quality of histories of this kind (which may possibly even be of use to someone for something) the histories of culture, to which all general histories tend more and more to approximate, are significant from the fact that after seriously and minutely examining various religious, philosophic, and political doctrines as causes of events, as soon as they have to describe an actual historic event such as the campaign of 1812 for instance, they involuntarily describe it as resulting from an exercise of power- and say plainly that that was the result of Napoleon's will.
And this was the first time that Jones lent any attention to the superstitious doctrines of his companion.
Grant endeavored to steer a middle course between the mystical doctrines of those sublimated creeds which daily involve their professors in the most absurd contradictions, and those fluent roles of moral government which would reduce the Saviour to a level with the teacher of a school of ethics.
He had become, however, a much venerated as well as a picturesque figure; and he exerted a powerful and constructive influence, not only directly, but indirectly through the preaching of his doctrines, in the main or in part, by the younger essayists and the chief Victorian poets and novelists, and in America by Emerson, with whom he maintained an almost lifelong friendship and correspondence.
Verily, all too well do I understand the dream's portent and monition: my DOCTRINE is in danger; tares want to be called wheat!
He was a believer, who was interested in religion primarily in its political aspect, and the new doctrine which ventured upon several new interpretations, just because it paved the way to discussion and analysis, was in principle disagreeable to him.
Monsieur," said Conrart, "you yourself are in the wrong persisting in decorating yourself with the name of an Epicurean; indeed, nothing here reminds me of the doctrine of the philosopher of Gargetta.
This is the doctrine of truth, and most consoling and refreshing it is to the true believer.
How far she developed and illustrated that conscienceless and austere doctrine to the girl- friends, who were mere transient shadows to her husband, I could not tell.