dogs


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Related to dogs: Docs

dog

 (dôg, dŏg)
n.
1. A domesticated carnivorous mammal (Canis familiaris syn. Canis lupus subsp. familiaris) occurring as a wide variety of breeds, many of which are traditionally used for hunting, herding, drawing sleds, and other tasks, and are kept as pets.
2. Any of various carnivorous mammals of the family Canidae, such as the dingo.
3. A male animal of the family Canidae, especially of a fox or a domesticated breed.
4. Any of various other animals, such as the prairie dog.
5. Informal
a. A person: You won, you lucky dog.
b. A person regarded as contemptible: You stole my watch, you dog.
6. Slang
a. A person regarded as unattractive or uninteresting.
b. Something of inferior or low quality: "The President had read the speech to some of his friends and they told him it was a dog" (John P. Roche).
c. An investment that produces a low return or a loss.
7. dogs Slang The feet.
8. See andiron.
9. Slang A hot dog; a wiener.
10. Any of various hooked or U-shaped metallic devices used for gripping or holding heavy objects.
11. Astronomy A sundog.
adv.
Totally; completely. Often used in combination: dog-tired.
tr.v. dogged, dog·ging, dogs
1. To track or trail persistently: "A stranger then is still dogging us" (Arthur Conan Doyle).
2. To hold or fasten with a mechanical device: "Watertight doors and hatches were dropped into place and dogged down to give the ship full watertight integrity" (Tom Clancy).
3.
a. To be persistently or inescapably associated with: Questions about his youthful indiscretions dogged him throughout his career.
b. To be recurrently or persistently in the mind; haunt: Despair dogged him in his final years.
Idioms:
dog it Slang
To fail to expend the effort needed to do or accomplish something.
go to the dogs
To go to ruin; degenerate.
put on the dog Informal
To make an ostentatious display of elegance, wealth, or culture.

[Middle English dogge, cur, ordinary dog (often as opposed to a hunting hound or other valuable dog), from Old English docga, dog, perhaps originally a diminutive or a hypocorism meaning "Darky, Dusky," from dox, dark, dusky (for the formation, compare Old English frox, frog, and frogga, frog, perhaps originally a diminutive).]

Dogs

(dɒɡz)
n
(Placename) Isle of Dogs a district in the East End of London, bounded on three sides by the River Thames, and a focus of major office development (Canary Wharf) in recent years

Dogs

(dɒɡz)
n
(Placename) Isle of Dogs a district in the East End of London, bounded on three sides by the River Thames, and a focus of major office development (Canary Wharf) in recent years

Dogs

See also animals.

Psychiatry. a delusion in which a person believes himself to be a dog.
a specialist in the care and breeding of dogs.
the branch of zoology that studies the dog, especially its natural history.
an abnormal love of dogs.
an intense dread of dogs.
the state or quality of being a mixed breed. — mongrelization, n. — mongrely, adj.
the love of dogs. Also called philocyny. — philocynic, n., adj.philocynical, adj.
References in classic literature ?
Her stealthy paws tread the very hall Where Snowball used to play, But she only spits at the dogs our pet So gallantly drove away.
The poor little houses lighted by kerosene lamps, the smoke from the chimneys mounting straight up into the clear air, the grunting of pigs, the women clad in cheap calico dresses and washing dishes in the kitchens, the footsteps of men coming out of the houses and going off to the stores and saloons of Main Street, the dogs barking and the children crying--all of these things made him seem, as he lurked in the darkness, oddly detached and apart from all life.
They came to pick up an easy living among the dogs and owls, which were quite defenceless against them; took possession of their comfortable houses and ate the eggs and puppies.
It pleased him also to get on familiar terms with the big dogs that came about him, rubbing themselves sociably against his legs.
The pale faces make themselves dogs to their women," muttered the Indian, in his native language, "and when they want to eat, their warriors must lay aside the tomahawk to feed their laziness.
But wherefore it was that after having repeatedly smelt the sea as a merchant sailor, I should now take it into my head to go on a whaling voyage; this the invisible police officer of the Fates, who has the constant surveillance of me, and secretly dogs me, and influences me in some unaccountable way --he can better answer than any one else.
Bernard's dogs, you know --relieve distressed travellers.
I and the other colts were feeding at the lower part of the field when we heard, quite in the distance, what sounded like the cry of dogs.
It was one of the laws of the veselija that no one goes hungry; and, while a rule made in the forests of Lithuania is hard to apply in the stockyards district of Chicago, with its quarter of a million inhabitants, still they did their best, and the children who ran in from the street, and even the dogs, went out again happier.
They have the same sort of worth only as horses and dogs.
Undoubtedly, all men are not equally fit subjects for civilization; and because the majority, like dogs and sheep, are tame by inherited disposition, this is no reason why the others should have their natures broken that they may be reduced to the same level.
I could not see what dog it was--indeed, I had forgotten all about the dogs when I drew near the kraal; that is what comes of want of experience, my father.