dolent

dolent

(ˈdəʊlənt)
adj
archaic sad; sorrowful
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
After "that most dolent day"* we hear no more of Dunbar.
Some of the finest examples in the area include the metal-cladded Lagginbiwak in the Simplon region, the wooden Fusshornbiwak in the Aletsch, and the Bivouac du Dolent above La Fouly made of synthetic materials.
Yesterday John Harlin had an accident in the region of Mont Dolent.
Harlin believes the biggest challenge on this three-month journey will be tackling a number of peaks over 4,000 metres high as well as difficult climbs such as the Aiguilles Rouges du Mont Dolent, the Matterhorn's Furggen-Grat and the Piz Badile.
The family, from the Netherlands, were climbing 12,500ft Mont Dolent, which is part of the Mont Blanc massif.
The family, from the Netherlands, were climbing 12,500ft (3,800m) Mont Dolent, which is part of the Mont Blanc massif.
The group was climbing the 12,500-foot Mont Dolent, which is part of the Mont Blanc massif.
730-34): "Hinc metuunt copiuntque dolent gaudentque, neque auras / respiciunt, clause tenebris et carcere ceco.
The area's ancient heritage is never far, and in the Menhir du Champ Dolent just outside Dol one is confronted with a prehistoric standing stone like a gigantic granite cigar planted upright in the earth.
Phyllis Johnson concludes that both Beroul and Thomas believed that `l'amour est plus fort que la vie et que la mort' and `l'extase resiste au poids de toute misere et douleur', `Dolor, dolent et soi doloir, le vocabulaire de la douleur et la conception de l'amour selon Beroul et Thomas', Romance Philology, 26 (1973), 546-54 (p.
Puis s'aparout le rey des boisdifs, A l'abbe de wyder sa terre li ad comaunde 615 E cil seit departit dolent e corouce
I begin with motet 2, Tous corps qui de bien amer / De souspirant cuer dolent / SUSPIRO, in which the identification of the tenor cannot yet be established with complete certainty.