Domagk


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Domagk

(German ˈdoːmak)
n
(Biography) Gerhard (ˈɡeːrhart). 1895–1964, German biochemist: Nobel prize for medicine (1939) for isolating sulphanilamide for treating bacterial infections
References in periodicals archive ?
Este laboratorio tambien diseno el primer medicamento antifebril y contra la enfermedad del sueno, luego siguieron Alka-Seltzer y para 1935 la primera sulfamida contra infecciones bacterianas, que le valio al investigador Gerhard Domagk, el Premio Nobel de Medicina.
Hlouschek V, Domagk D, Naehrig J, Siewert JR, Domschke W.
A German company patented the drug, and ultimately, Domagk won a Nobel Prize in 1939.
Brodbeck, Mazza, and Lalanne 2009; Domagk, Schwartz, and Plass 2010; Kennedy 2004; McCarthy 2012; Yarden and Yarden 2010).
Domagk, Schwartz and Plass (2010), when defining Interactivity as a means of information exchange, claim that it increases as more sensory channels (such as hearing and vision) show evidence similar to those proposed by Paller et al.
The discovery of Penicillin by Alexander Fleming in 1928 and Sulfonamides by Domagk in 1932 and their use in the treatment of middle ear infections and its complications led to a drastic fall in the incidence of complications.
Stefanie Samietz was supported by a scholarship from the Gerhard Domagk program of the University Medicine Greifswald.
El regimen nazi impidio a los investigadores Richard Kuhn, Adolf Butenandt y Gerhard Domagk recibir los premios de quimica y medicina, en 1938 y 1939, respectivamente; e hizo lo mismo para que Otto Heinrich Warburg no recibiera su segundo Premio Nobel de Medicina (el primero lo habia recibido en 1931).
Before the 1930s were done, Gerhard Domagk, who discovered the first sulfonamide antibiotic, would be recognized with a Nobel, beating Fleming by six years.
Que conozca o recuerde a pioneros de la medicina, como Leeuwnhock, Pasteur, Shawdin, Jeeneer, Finlay, Koch, Laveran, Ehrlich, Domagk, Freud, Flemming.
It tells how Gerhard Domagk, a young German physician during WW I, saw the deaths of thousands of wounded soldiers from gas gangrene and other infections that invaded what would have otherwise been non-fatal wounds.