domain

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do·main

 (dō-mān′)
n.
1. A territory over which rule or control is exercised.
2. A sphere of activity, influence, or knowledge: the domain of history. See Synonyms at field.
3. Mathematics
a. The set of all possible values of an independent variable of a function.
b. An open connected set that contains at least one point.
4. Computers A group of networked computers that share a common communications address.
5. Physics Any of numerous contiguous regions in a ferromagnetic material in which the direction of spontaneous magnetization is uniform and different from that in neighboring regions.
6. Biology Any of three primary divisions of organisms, consisting of the eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea, that rank above a kingdom in taxonomic systems based on similarities of DNA sequences.
7. Law The land of one with paramount title and absolute ownership.

[French domaine, blend of Old French demaine (from Late Latin dominicum) and Latin dominium, property, both from dominus, lord; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

domain

(dəˈmeɪn)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) land governed by a ruler or government
2. land owned by one person or family
3. a field or scope of knowledge or activity
4. (Physical Geography) a region having specific characteristics or containing certain types of plants or animals
5. (Environmental Science) Austral and NZ a park or recreation reserve maintained by a public authority, often the government
6. (Law) law the absolute ownership and right to dispose of land. See also demesne, eminent domain
7. (Mathematics) maths
a. the set of values of the independent variable of a function for which the functional value exists: the domain of sin x is all real numbers. Compare range8a
b. any open set containing at least one point
8. (Logic) logic another term for universe of discourse: domain of quantification.
9. (Philosophy) philosophy range of significance (esp in the phrase domain of definition)
10. (General Physics) physics Also called: magnetic domain one of the regions in a ferromagnetic solid in which all the atoms have their magnetic moments aligned in the same direction
11. (Computer Science) computing a group of computers, functioning and administered as a unit, that are identified by sharing the same domain name on the internet
12. (Biology) biology Also called: superkingdom the highest level of classification of living organisms. Three domains are recognized: Archaea (see archaean), Bacteria (see bacteria), and Eukarya (see eukaryote)
13. (Biochemistry) biochem a structurally compact portion of a protein molecule
[C17: from French domaine, from Latin dominium property, from dominus lord]

do•main

(doʊˈmeɪn)

n.
1. a field of action, thought, influence, etc.
2. the territory governed by a single ruler or government; realm.
3. a region characterized by a specific feature, type of wildlife, etc.
4. Law. land to which there is superior title and absolute ownership.
5. Math. the set of values assigned to the independent variables of a function.
6. Computers.
a. a group of computers and devices on a network that are administered under the same protocol.
b. the top level in a domain name, indicating the type of organization or geographical location and officially designated in the suffix, as.com for commercial enterprises in the U.S.
7. one of many regions of magnetic polarity within a ferromagnetic body that collectively determine the magnetic properties of the body by their arrangement.
[1595–1605; < French domaine, alter. of Old French demeine < Late Latin dominicum, n. use of neuter of Latin dominicus of a master]

do·main

(dō-mān′)
1. Mathematics The set of all values that an independent variable of a function can have. In the function y = 2x, the set of values that x (the independent variable) can have is the domain. Compare range.
2. Biology A division of organisms that ranks above a kingdom in systems of classification that are based on shared similarities in DNA sequences rather than shared structural similarities. In these systems, there are three domains: the archaea, the bacteria, and the eukaryotes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.domain - a particular environment or walk of lifedomain - a particular environment or walk of life; "his social sphere is limited"; "it was a closed area of employment"; "he's out of my orbit"
environment - the totality of surrounding conditions; "he longed for the comfortable environment of his living room"
distaff - the sphere of work by women
front - a sphere of activity involving effort; "the Japanese were active last week on the diplomatic front"; "they advertise on many different fronts"
kingdom, realm, land - a domain in which something is dominant; "the untroubled kingdom of reason"; "a land of make-believe"; "the rise of the realm of cotton in the south"
lap - an area of control or responsibility; "the job fell right in my lap"
political arena, political sphere - a sphere of intense political activity
preserve - a domain that seems to be specially reserved for someone; "medicine is no longer a male preserve"
province, responsibility - the proper sphere or extent of your activities; "it was his province to take care of himself"
2.domain - territory over which rule or control is exercised; "his domain extended into Europe"; "he made it the law of the land"
country, land, state - the territory occupied by a nation; "he returned to the land of his birth"; "he visited several European countries"
archduchy - the domain controlled by an archduke or archduchess
barony - the domain of a baron
duchy, dukedom - the domain controlled by a duke or duchess
earldom - the domain controlled by an earl or count or countess
emirate - the domain controlled by an emir
empire, imperium - the domain ruled by an emperor or empress; the region over which imperial dominion is exercised
fiefdom - the domain controlled by a feudal lord
grand duchy - the domain controlled by a grand duke or grand duchess
viscounty - the domain controlled by a viscount or viscountess
khanate - the realm of a khan
realm, kingdom - the domain ruled by a king or queen
principality, princedom - territory ruled by a prince
sheikdom, sheikhdom - the domain ruled by a sheik
suzerainty - the domain of a suzerain
region - a large indefinite location on the surface of the Earth; "penguins inhabit the polar regions"
3.domain - (mathematics) the set of values of the independent variable for which a function is defined
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
set - (mathematics) an abstract collection of numbers or symbols; "the set of prime numbers is infinite"
4.domain - people in general; especially a distinctive group of people with some shared interest; "the Western world"
social class, socio-economic class, stratum, class - people having the same social, economic, or educational status; "the working class"; "an emerging professional class"
academe, academia - the academic world
Grub Street - the world of literary hacks
5.domain - the content of a particular field of knowledge
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
discipline, field of study, subject area, subject field, bailiwick, subject, field, study - a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?"; "teachers should be well trained in their subject"; "anthropology is the study of human beings"
realm, region - a knowledge domain that you are interested in or are communicating about; "it was a limited realm of discourse"; "here we enter the region of opinion"; "the realm of the occult"
scientific knowledge - knowledge accumulated by systematic study and organized by general principles; "mathematics is the basis for much scientific knowledge"

domain

noun
1. area, world, field, department, sector, discipline, sphere, realm, speciality the great experimenters in the domain of art
2. sphere, area, field, concern, scene, sector, territory, province, arena, realm This sort of information should be in the public domain.
3. kingdom, lands, region, territory, estate, province, empire, realm, dominion, demesne, policies (Scot.) the mighty king's domain
4. (N.Z.) public park, park, recreation ground, garden, pleasure garden The domain includes a Victorian gazebo and riverside grotto.

domain

noun
A sphere of activity, experience, study, or interest:
Slang: bag.
Translations
مَجال إهْتِمام، دائِرَة نُفوذمُلْك، أمْلاك، أراضٍ
definiční obordoménapanství
domænefagområdeområde
määramispiirkond
alaaluedomeenilajiluokka
domainesuper-règne
kutatási terület
landareign; ríkisviî
sferavaldos
nozaresfērazemes īpašums
panstvo
definitionsmängddomän
araziilgi alanımülk
lãnh địalãnh thổ

domain

[dəʊˈmeɪn]
A. N
1. (= lands etc) → dominio m, propiedad f
2. (fig) → campo m, competencia f
the matter is now in the public domainel asunto es ya del dominio público
B. CPD domain name N (Internet) → nombre m de dominio

domain

[dəʊˈmeɪn] n
(= field) → domaine m
(= area of influence) → zone f (d'action)
(COMPUTING)domaine mdomain name n (COMPUTING)nom m de domaine

domain

n
(lit: = estate) → Gut nt; (belonging to state, Crown) → Domäne f; the Crown domainsdie Ländereien der Krone
(fig)Domäne f ? public
(Math) → Funktionsbereich m
(Comput) → Domäne f, → Domain nt

domain

[dəʊˈmeɪn] n (lands) → domini mpl (fig) → campo, sfera (Math) → dominio

domain

(dəˈmein) noun
1. an old word for the lands which belong to a person. the king's domains.
2. one's area of interest or of knowledge. That question is outside my domain.
References in classic literature ?
Then inside other fences were the particular domains of other gods.
We had at last arrived on the borders of this forest, doubtless one of the finest of Captain Nemo's immense domains.
On passing the limits of O-push-y-e-cut's domains, the travellers left the elevated table-lands, and all the wild and romantic scenery which has just been described.
Do you understand now, O Prince," she said, "why a million warriors guard the domains of the Holy Therns by day and by night?
Small spirits and spacious souls had those shepherds: but, my brethren, what small domains have even the most spacious souls hitherto been!
Then a Stag intruded into his domain and shared his pasture.
She could not recall a line of them, for Jove had decreed that the memory of them abide in Pluto's painful domain, as a part of the apparatus.
The domain of Pierrefonds, lands, woods, meadows, waters, and forests, surrounded by good walls.
No sooner had he crossed the border of this domain when two guards seized him and carried him before the Grand Gallipoot of the Growleywogs, who scowled upon him ferociously and asked him why he dared intrude upon his territory.
No sooner had the Fairy reached her own domain than she made herself visible, and turning to the Prince she told him that unless he obeyed all her commands down to the minutest detail he would be severely punished.
Found in a Bottle," "A Descent Into a Maelstrom" and "The Balloon Hoax"; such tales of conscience as "William Wilson," "The Black Cat" and "The Tell-tale Heart," wherein the retributions of remorse are portrayed with an awful fidelity; such tales of natural beauty as "The Island of the Fay" and "The Domain of Arnheim"; such marvellous studies in ratiocination as the "Gold-bug," "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Purloined Letter" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget," the latter, a recital of fact, demonstrating the author's wonderful capability of correctly analyzing the mysteries of the human mind; such tales of illusion and banter as "The Premature Burial" and "The System of Dr.
The theory of the transference of the collective will of the people to historic persons may perhaps explain much in the domain of jurisprudence and be essential for its purposes, but in its application to history, as soon as revolutions, conquests, or civil wars occur- that is, as soon as history begins- that theory explains nothing.