Domesday Book

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Domes·day Book

 (do͞omz′dā′, dōmz′-) also Dooms·day Book (do͞omz′-)
n.
The written record of a census and survey of English landowners and their property made by order of William the Conqueror in 1085-1086.

[From Middle English domesday, doomsday; see doomsday.]

Domesday Book

or

Doomsday Book

n
(Historical Terms) history the record of a survey of the land of England carried out by the commissioners of William I in 1086

Domes′day

(or Dooms′day) Book`


n.
a record of a survey of the lands of England made by order of William the Conqueror about 1086, giving ownership, extent, value, etc., of the properties.

Domesday Book

A 1086 survey of land holdings in England initiated by William the Conqueror.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Domesday Book - record of a British census and land survey in 1085-1086 ordered by William the ConquerorDomesday Book - record of a British census and land survey in 1085-1086 ordered by William the Conqueror
Translations

Domesday Book

[ˈduːmzdeɪˌbʊk] N the Domesday Bookel Domesday Book (libro del registro catastral realizado en Inglaterra en 1086)
References in periodicals archive ?
At the time of the Domesday survey, it is likely there was a tiny chapel on the site of St Nicholas's Church, with a cluster of fishermen's cottages, but these were not thought significant enough to register.
HANDSWORTH is recorded in the Domesday Survey of 1086 as a very small village belonging to William FitzAnsculf, the Lord of Dudley.
The Estate of Caldecote was mentioned in the Domesday survey of 1086 when it was registered as being under the ownership of the Bishop of Chester.
Here in Britain, by the time of the Domesday Survey, there were 6,000 mills in 3,000 locations - a veritable mainstay of the early UK economy.
There are plenty of historic heritage sites to spot on a walk through Acklam including St Mary's Church, built in 1874, South Lodge, with its large wrought iron gates, built in 1912, the avenue of lime trees, planted at the end of the 17th Century and Acklam Hall which was mentioned in the Domesday survey in 1086.
Indeed, none of the places called Scholes - and there are three in the West Riding alone - are listed in the Domesday Survey.
England's Population: A History Since the Domesday Survey by Andrew Hinde (Hodder Arnold, hb 45 [pounds sterling], pb 14.
IN the Domesday survey the name appears as "Icetone", which comes from Itchen tun, meaning the tun or settlement by the Itchen, the local river.
Abstract: Alongside the Roman census from Augustus' time and the ecclesiastical surveys or polyptychs of the 8th and 9th century Carolingian kingdoms, the Domesday Survey of 1086 occupies a most significant place in accounting history.
The Domesday Survey of 1086 provides high quality and detailed information on the outputs, inputs and tax assessments of most English manors.
If this was indeed the case, then we might expect the frontier of high-value mills in the north in the early fourteenth century to appear in a less developed state - that is, further towards the south and east - at the time of the Domesday survey.