Dominican


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Related to Dominican: Dominican order

Do·min·i·can 1

 (də-mĭn′ĭ-kən)
adj.
Of or relating to the Dominican Republic or its people or culture.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of the Dominican Republic.
2. A person of Dominican ancestry.

Do·mi·ni·can 2

(dō′-mə-nē′kən)
adj.
Of or relating to Dominica or its people or culture.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Dominica.
2. A person of Dominican ancestry.

Do·min·i·can 3

 (də-mĭn′ĭ-kən)
n.
A member of a Roman Catholic order of preaching friars established in 1216 by Saint Dominic.

Do·min′i·can adj.

Dominican

(dəˈmɪnɪkən)
n
(Roman Catholic Church)
a. a member of an order of preaching friars founded by Saint Dominic in 1215; a Blackfriar
b. a nun of one of the orders founded under the patronage of Saint Dominic
adj
(Roman Catholic Church) of or relating to Saint Dominic or the Dominican order

Dominican

(dəˈmɪnɪkən)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to the Dominican Republic or Dominica
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of the Dominican Republic or Dominica

Do•min•i•can1

(dəˈmɪn ɪ kən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to St. Dominic or the Dominicans.
n.
2. a member of one of the mendicant religious orders founded by St. Dominic; Black Friar.
[1625–35; Dominic(us), Latinized form of Domingo de Guzman, founder of the order]

Do•min•i•can2

(dəˈmɪn ɪ kən for 1,3; ˌdɒm əˈni kən, dəˈmɪn ɪ- for 2, 4 )

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the Dominican Republic.
2. of or pertaining to the Commonwealth of Dominica.
n.
3. a native or inhabitant of the Dominican Republic.
4. a native or inhabitant of the Commonwealth of Dominica.
[< Sp dominicano; (definitions 2, 4) Dominic (a)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dominican - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the black mantle of the Dominican orderDominican - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the black mantle of the Dominican order
Dominican order - a Roman Catholic order of mendicant preachers founded in the 13th century
friar, mendicant - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on alms
2.Dominican - a native or inhabitant of the Dominican Republic
Dominican Republic - a republic in the West Indies; located on the eastern two-thirds of the island of Hispaniola
West Indian - a native or inhabitant of the West Indies
Adj.1.Dominican - of or relating to or characteristic of the Dominican Republic or its people; "the Dominican population"
2.Dominican - of or relating to Saint Dominic or the Dominican order; "Dominican monks"
Translations

Dominican

[dəˈmɪnɪkən]
A. ADJdominicano
B. N
1. (Pol) → dominicano/a m/f
2. (Rel) → dominico m, dominicano m
C. CPD Dominican Republic NRepública f Dominicana

Dominican

1 (Geog)
nDominikaner(in) m(f)

Dominican

2 (Eccl)
nDominikaner m
adjDominikaner-, dominikanisch; Dominican monasteryDominikanerkloster nt

Dominican

1 [dəˈmɪnɪkən] adj & n (Rel) → domenicano/a

Dominican

2 [dəˈmɪnɪkən] adj & n (Geog) → dominicano/a
References in classic literature ?
One favourite volume was a small octavo edition of the Directorium Inquisitorum, by the Dominican Eymeric de Gironne; and there were passages in Pomponius Mela, about the old African Satyrs and OEgipans, over which Usher would sit dreaming for hours.
I speak of the Dominican friars--men who wear a coarse, heavy brown robe and a cowl, in this hot climate, and go barefoot.
There were portraits of men with large, melancholy eyes which seemed to say you knew not what; there were long monks in the Franciscan habit or in the Dominican, with distraught faces, making gestures whose sense escaped you; there was an Assumption of the Virgin; there was a Crucifixion in which the painter by some magic of feeling had been able to suggest that the flesh of Christ's dead body was not human flesh only but divine; and there was an Ascension in which the Saviour seemed to surge up towards the empyrean and yet to stand upon the air as steadily as though it were solid ground: the uplifted arms of the Apostles, the sweep of their draperies, their ecstatic gestures, gave an impression of exultation and of holy joy.
The Dominican and Franciscan friars, also, who had come to England in the thirteenth century, soon after the foundation of their orders in Italy, and who had been full at first of passionate zeal for the spiritual and physical welfare of the poor, had now departed widely from their early character and become selfish, luxurious, ignorant, and unprincipled.
Besides, there are in this faubourg a mall, a tennis-court, and a house of Dominicans.
Whilst D'Artagnan and Porthos were looking on with critical glances, which disguised an extreme impatience to get forward, a magnificent dais approached preceded by a hundred Jesuits and a hundred Dominicans, and escorted by two archdeacons, a treasurer, a penitent and twelve canons.
Now she entered the church depressed and humiliated, not even able to remember whether it was built by the Franciscans or the Dominicans.
First he passed two Dominicans in their long black dresses, who swept by him with downcast looks and pattering lips, without so much as a glance at him.
23-25 by the Dominican Historical Institute at the order's University of St.
Manuel Abreu, Dominican Republic; Juana Abreu, United States; Candida Rosa Acosta, United States Oneida Acosta de Araujo, United States; Rosa Alcantara, United States; Selene Alcantara, Dominican Republic; Danny Alcantara Taveras, Dominican Republic; Hipolito Algarroba, United States; Ubencia Algarroba, United States; Josefina Allende, United States; Ramon Almanzar, United States; Rosa Almanzar, Dominican Republic; Luz M.
Authors Julia Alvarez, Junot Diaz and Loida Maritza Perez talk about their distinctive Dominican heritage and their common cultural roots with African Americans
Last June, President Leonel Fernandez of the Dominican Republic and President Rene Preval of the Republic of Haiti met in the capital city of Port-au-Prince to consider the state of relations between both nations and to sign substantive agreements in several areas such as trade and tourism.

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