Don Quixote


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Don Qui·xo·te

 (kē-hō′tē, kwĭk′sət)
n.
An impractical idealist bent on righting incorrigible wrongs.

[After Don Quixote, , hero of a satirical chivalric romance by Miguel de Cervantes.]

Don Quixote

(ˈdɒn kiːˈhəʊtiː; ˈkwɪksət; Spanish don kiˈxote)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an impractical idealist
[after the hero of Cervantes' Don Quixote de la Mancha]

Don Quix•o•te

(ˌdɒn kiˈhoʊ ti, -teɪ, dɒn ˈkwɪk sət)
n.
the hero of a novel by Cervantes who was inspired by lofty but impractical ideals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Don Quixote - the hero of a romance by CervantesDon Quixote - the hero of a romance by Cervantes; chivalrous but impractical
2.Don Quixote - any impractical idealist (after Cervantes' hero)
idealist, dreamer - someone guided more by ideals than by practical considerations
Translations

Don Quixote

[dɒnˈkwɪksət] NDon Quijote
References in classic literature ?
Scarce had the rubicund Apollo spread o'er the face of the broad spacious earth the golden threads of his bright hair, scarce had the little birds of painted plumage attuned their notes to hail with dulcet and mellifluous harmony the coming of the rosy Dawn, that, deserting the soft couch of her jealous spouse, was appearing to mortals at the gates and balconies of the Manchegan horizon, when the renowned knight Don Quixote of La Mancha, quitting the lazy down, mounted his celebrated steed Rocinante and began to traverse the ancient and famous Campo de Montiel;'" which in fact he was actually traversing.
Don Quixote, observing the respectful bearing of the Alcaide of the fortress (for so innkeeper and inn seemed in his eyes), made answer, "Sir Castellan, for me anything will suffice, for
The landlord eyed him over but did not find him as good as Don Quixote said, nor even half as good; and putting him up in the stable, he returned to see what might be wanted by his guest, whom the damsels, who had by this time made their peace with him, were now relieving of his armour.
Oh, never, surely, was there knight So served by hand of dame, As served was he, Don Quixote hight, When from his town he came; With maidens waiting on himself, Princesses on his hack-
or Rocinante, for that, ladies mine, is my horse's name, and Don Quixote of La Mancha is my own; for though I had no intention of declaring myself until my achievements in your service and honour had made me known, the necessity of adapting that old ballad of Lancelot to the present occasion has given you the knowledge of my name altogether prematurely.
I would gladly eat a bit of something," said Don Quixote, "for I feel it would come very seasonably.
While this was going on there came up to the inn a sowgelder, who, as he approached, sounded his reed pipe four or five times, and thereby completely convinced Don Quixote that he was in some famous castle, and that they were regaling him with music, and that the stockfish was trout, the bread the whitest, the wenches ladies, and the landlord the castellan of the castle; and consequently he held that his enterprise and sally had been to some purpose.
The pair are to star in a new adaptation of Don Quixote as part of the spring and summer 2016 season.
This year marks the quadricentennial anniversary of one of the most celebrated works of fiction of all time, that is Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes' satirical novel Don Quixote.
With these two beautiful pieces as the starting point, 'Coypel's Don Quixote Tapestries: Illustrating a Spanish Novel in Eighteenth-Century France' (until 17 May) was created in just 22 months--exactly the age of my daughter.
This relation is brought to the foreground in Coetzee's most recent novel, The Childhood of Jesus (2013), but it also underlies his previous ones, Age of Iron (1998), Disgrace (2000), and Slow Man (2005), as well as his critical pieces, "The Novel Today" (1988) and the "Jerusalem Prize Acceptance Speech" (1992b), all of which contain echoes of Cervantes's masterpiece, Don Quixote ([1605, 1615]2005).
Called 3552 Don Quixote, the body is the third largest near-Earth object-mostly rocky bodies, or asteroids, that orbit the Sun in the vicinity of Earth.