Donation of Constantine


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Related to Donation of Constantine: Constitutum Constantini

Donation of Constantine

n.
A document fabricated probably during the 8th century, in which the emperor Constantine I purportedly grants to the Papacy temporal dominion over Italy and other western regions. Used throughout much of the Middle Ages as evidence in justifying Papal claims in secular affairs, it was demonstrated to be false in the 15th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
Christian soldiers seized Rome in the eighth century after the Donation of Constantine was inflicted and incorporated into the False Decretals (CE1907 vol.
Perhaps the most famous of these is the Donation of Constantine.
Thanks to the myth of the Donation of Constantine of honouring the Pope with the emperor's honours and all the adornments of an Emperor, the diadem, the phrygium, the shoulder scarf, the purple cloak and the red tunic and the sceptre were taken over by the Church leaders.
The book is accessible and occasionally even humorous--regarding suspect relics, "who but a heretic could doubt so plain a divine endorsement"--but explanatory footnotes identifying Charlemagne, Cicero, and the Donation of Constantine are unnecessary in a book primarily aimed at specialists (166).
9) Andre Vauchez, Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages (London: Routledge, 2001), 445; Johannes Fried, Donation of Constantine and Constitutum Constantini: The Misinterpretation of a Fiction And Its Original Meaning (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2007).
By the same token, Valla's arguments in The Falsely Believed and forged Donation of Constantine (1440) (2), which has been contested by both Dante and Nicholas of Cusa on moral grounds, discredits papal claims to temporal power by an aggressively philological analysis of the text.
In Lorenzo Valla's On the Donation of Constantine (1440), Bowersock provides a new translation in company with the Latin text established by Wofram Setz for Monumenta Germaniae Historical (1976).
On the Donation of Constantine is a work of great seriousness which won for its author a reputation for philological brilliance and (ultimately) a place on the Index.
As an appendix to this argument, Humbert produced the spurious Donation of Constantine, which gave almost unlimited power to popes.
In her discussion of the early modern scholarship on TF, Whealey shows that skepticism was sometimes due to the spirit of criticism of ancient sources that led to the discovery of fraudulent documents such as the Donation of Constantine.
The Donation of Constantine has fidelity as evidence about medieval church-state relations, but not about Constantine's relations with the Church.
The Introduction notes the paucity of any direct reference to Wyclif's earlier doctrine of dominion; but does not relate it to Wyclif's later insistence upon the duty of kings and lay lords to disendow the Church of all its temporalities and jurisdiction as the path back to its original apostolic state of purity before it was corrupted by the Donation of Constantine.