doomster


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doomster

(ˈduːmstə)
n
1. a person habitually given to predictions of impending disaster or doom
2. (Law) archaic a judge
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References in periodicals archive ?
I am not a soothsayer, nor am I a doomster, but there is a crisis looming like dark clouds over the horizon.
And Rich's protagonist, perhaps most interestingly, is a witty, overt embodiment of risk thought, a satirical creation of a neurotically inventive Chicken-Little doomster with a pathologically heightened environmental risk consciousness who finds an unusual, corporate niche in the accelerated deregulated capitalism of the post-Reagan era.
Clearly, those 1960s doomster reports not only were alarmist, but wrong.
Larry himself isn't a complete doomster either, truth be known.
When a doomster's roof leaks, for example, does he shun the services of the roofer who can repair the roof for less than it would cost the doomster to fix the roof himself?
The chief god of the Norse, a one-eyed doomster named Odin, ate nothing and subsisted entirely on the mead that flowed from the teats of his goat, Heidrun (pronounced "Hi-Drone").
Some, like Robert Balling's claims that global warming is only a doomster myth, are well known and dismissed as ideology by the majority of climatological scientists.
True, Roubini is a paid-up doomster, not a cheery fellow at all.
The most famous population doomster in history, the Rev.
The Doomster used sneakily subtle methods on him, knowing full well that Maesteg lads don't believe in being injured or otherwise distracted.
Although Ehrlich was certainly the most strident doomster, he was far from alone in his famine forecasts.
Derek McGregor The one safe prediction I can make about this final is that doomster Jim Farry will be jeered like never before.