dormouse

(redirected from Dormice)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Dormice: Gliridae

dor·mouse

 (dôr′mous′)
n. pl. dor·mice (-mīs′)
Any of various small omnivorous rodents of the family Gliridae of Eurasia and Africa, having long furred tails and known for their long hibernation periods.

[Middle English, perhaps alteration (influenced by mous, mouse) of Anglo-Norman *dormeus, inclined to sleep, hibernating, from Old French dormir, to sleep; see dormant.]

dormouse

(ˈdɔːˌmaʊs)
n, pl -mice
(Animals) any small Old World rodent of the family Gliridae, esp the Eurasian Muscardinus avellanarius, resembling a mouse with a furry tail
[C15: dor-, perhaps from Old French dormir to sleep, from Latin dormīre + mouse]

dor•mouse

(ˈdɔrˌmaʊs)

n., pl. -mice (-ˌmaɪs)
any small usu. bushy-tailed Old World climbing rodent of the family Gliridae.
[1400–50; late Middle English dormowse, dormoise, perhaps Anglo-French derivative of Old French dormir to sleep (see dormant), with final syllable reanalyzed as mouse]

dormouse

- A rodent but not a mouse, it may be a corrupted form of French dormeus, "sleepy."
See also related terms for mice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weatherdormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weather
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
family Gliridae, Gliridae - dormice and other Old World forms
Glis glis, loir - large European dormouse
hazel mouse, Muscardinus avellanarius - a variety of dormouse
lerot - dormouse of southern Europe and northern Africa
Translations

dormouse

[ˈdɔːmaʊs] N (dormice (pl)) → lirón m

dormouse

[ˈdɔːrmaʊs] [dormice] [ˈdɔːrmaɪs] (pl) nloir m

dormouse

n pl <dormice> → Haselmaus f; edible or fat dormouseSiebenschläfer m; common dormouseGemeiner Siebenschläfer

dormouse

[ˈdɔːˌmaʊs] n (dormice (pl)) [ˈdɔːˌmaɪs]ghiro
References in classic literature ?
How a Gardener may get rid of the Dormice that eat His Peaches.
Still it belongs to government, and I ought not to waste it; but, having received the signal that I might rest for an hour" (here he glanced at the sun-dial, for there was everything in the enclosure of Montlhery, even a sun-dial), "and having ten minutes before me, and my strawberries being ripe, when a day longer -- by-the-by, sir, do you think dormice eat them?
And, then, such as it is, it is filled with dormice, who eat everything.
I have just discovered how a gardener may get rid of the dormice that eat his peaches.
The rest of the animals, like the dormice and the water-voles and the bats, they will have to go back and live in the fields where they were born till we come home again.
There were bundles of labels, cupboards, and drawers with compartments, and wire guards for the cupboards, to allow free access to the air whilst keeping out slugs, mice, dormice, and rats, all of them very curious fanciers of tulips at two thousand francs a bulb.
The ale is inspired by the reintroduction of endangered hazel dormice by the People's Trust for Endangered Species PTES at a secret Warwickshire location earlier this year.
RARE hazel dormice have been released into a Warwickshire woodland in an effort to stem the decline of the charismatic species.
By EMILY BEAMENT News Reporter RARE hazel dormice have been released into a Warwickshire woodland in an effort to stem the decline of the charismatic species.
HAZEL dormice numbers have declined by almost three quarters in the last 20 years, UK-wide research shows.
Hazel dormice have been spotted at a new conservation reserve in Carmarthenshire a lot earlier than was originally expected.
The dormice - also known as the Common dormouse - were once widespread in England and Wales, but have been lost from 17 counties since Victorian times and are now only commonly found in the South of England and areas of the English-Welsh border.