dragon

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Related to Dragons: History of dragons

Drag·on

 (drăg′ən)
n.
See Draco2.

drag·on

 (drăg′ən)
n.
1. A mythical monster traditionally represented as a gigantic reptile having a long tail, sharp claws, scaly skin, and often wings.
2. Any of various lizards, such as the Komodo dragon or the flying lizard.
3.
a. A fiercely vigilant or intractable person.
b. Something very formidable or dangerous.
4. Archaic A large snake or serpent.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dracō, dracōn-, large serpent, from Greek drakōn; see derk- in Indo-European roots.]

dragon

(ˈdræɡən)
n
1. a mythical monster usually represented as breathing fire and having a scaly reptilian body, wings, claws, and a long tail
2. informal a fierce or intractable person, esp a woman
3. (Animals) any of various very large lizards, esp the Komodo dragon
4. (Plants) any of various North American aroid plants, esp the green dragon
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a manifestation of Satan or an attendant devil
6. (Sailing) a yacht of the International Dragon Class, 8.88m long (29.2 feet), used in racing
7. (Recreational Drugs) chase the dragon slang to smoke opium or heroin
[C13: from Old French, from Latin dracō, from Greek drakōn; related to drakos eye]
ˈdragoness fem n
ˈdragonish adj

drag•on

(ˈdræg ən)

n.
1. a mythical monster generally represented as a huge winged reptile with a crested head, often spouting fire.
2. a fierce, combative person.
3. a very strict, protective woman.
5. a short musket of the 16th and 17th centuries.
6. a soldier armed with such a musket.
7. (cap.) the constellation Draco.
8. Archaic. a huge serpent or snake.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin dracōn-, s. of dracō < Greek drákōn kind of serpent]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dragon - a creature of Teutonic mythologydragon - a creature of Teutonic mythology; usually represented as breathing fire and having a reptilian body and sometimes wings
mythical creature, mythical monster - a monster renowned in folklore and myth
wivern, wyvern - a fire-breathing dragon used in medieval heraldry; had the head of a dragon and the tail of a snake and a body with wings and two legs
2.dragon - a fiercely vigilant and unpleasant woman
disagreeable woman, unpleasant woman - a woman who is an unpleasant person
3.Dragon - a faint constellation twisting around the north celestial pole and lying between Ursa Major and Cepheus
4.dragon - any of several small tropical Asian lizards capable of gliding by spreading winglike membranes on each side of the bodydragon - any of several small tropical Asian lizards capable of gliding by spreading winglike membranes on each side of the body
agamid, agamid lizard - a lizard of the family Agamidae
genus Draco, Draco - a reptile genus known as flying dragons or flying lizards
Translations
draak
تَنِّيـنتِنّين
драконзмей
dracvíbria
drak
dragedragon
drako
lohe
اژدها
lohikäärmehuuhkaja
דרקון
zmaj
sárkány
naga
dreki
ドラゴン
draco
slibinas
pūķis
balaurdragonzmeu
drak
zmaj
drake
มังกร
con rồngrồng

dragon

[ˈdrægən] N
1. (Myth) → dragón m
2. (= woman) → bruja f

dragon

[ˈdrægən] ndragon m

dragon

n (lit, fig inf)Drache m

dragon

[ˈdrægn] ndrago

dragon

(ˈdrӕgən) noun
a mythical beast, a usually large, winged, fire-breathing reptile. St George and the dragon.

dragon

تَنِّيـن drak drage Drache δράκος dragón lohikäärme dragon zmaj drago draak drage smok dragão дракон drake มังกร ejderha con rồng
References in classic literature ?
In this enterprise, however, he had more real difficulties than generally fell to the lot of a knight-errant of yore, who seldom had anything but giants, enchanters, fiery dragons, and such like easily conquered adversaries, to contend with and had to make his way merely through gates of iron and brass, and walls of adamant to the castle keep, where the lady of his heart was confined; all which he achieved as easily as a man would carve his way to the centre of a Christmas pie; and then the lady gave him her hand as a matter of course.
George and the Dragon; which dragon I maintain to have been a whale; for in many old chronicles whales and dragons are strangely jumbled together, and often stand for each other.
The geologist has discovered that the figures of serpents, griffins, flying dragons, and other fanciful embellishments of heraldry, have their prototypes in the forms of fossil species which were extinct before man was created, and hence "indicate a faint and shadowy knowledge of a previous state of organic existence.
He had reared dragons from the egg, in his laboratory, he had watched over them like a mother, and patiently studied them and experimented upon them while they grew.
But as nothing of the sort happened to be walking about on Yarmouth flats that night, I provided the best substitute I could by dreaming of dragons until morning.
However, to the latter-day hero, whose appetite for dragons is not keen, this absence of adventure is perhaps rather pleasurable than otherwise; and I confess that I enjoyed the days I spent on foot with Nicolete none the less because they passed in tranquil uneventfulness,--that is, without events of the violent kind.
So, as it is easier for me to imitate him in this than in cleaving giants asunder, cutting off serpents' heads, slaying dragons, routing armies, destroying fleets, and breaking enchantments, and as this place is so well suited for a similar purpose, I must not allow the opportunity to escape which now so conveniently offers me its forelock.
Man does not appear to me to be intended to enjoy felicity so unmixed; happiness is like the enchanted palaces we read of in our childhood, where fierce, fiery dragons defend the entrance and approach; and monsters of all shapes and kinds, requiring to be overcome ere victory is ours.
Staring once at the red eyes across the river, he conceived them to be grow- ing larger, as the orbs of a row of dragons ad- vancing.
That task being accomplished, you are to put on his sandals, in order to follow in your father's footsteps, and to gird on his sword, so that you may fight giants and dragons, as King Aegeus did in his youth.
Did I have it carried away by seven flying dragons, or was it merely a trifling matter of turning it into a milk-white hind?
The dragons have gone, and so have the knights, but still she lingers in our midst.