Dravidian

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Dra·vid·i·an

 (drə-vĭd′ē-ən)
n.
1. A large family of languages spoken especially in southern India and northern Sri Lanka that includes Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, and Kannada.
2. A member of any of the peoples that speak one of the Dravidian languages, especially a member of one of the pre-Indo-European peoples of southern India.

[From Sanskrit drāviḍaḥ, a Dravidian.]

Dra·vid′i·an, Dra·vid′ic (-vĭd′ĭk) adj.

Dravidian

(drəˈvɪdɪən)
n
1. (Languages) a family of languages spoken in S and central India and Sri Lanka, including Tamil, Malayalam, Telugu, Kannada, and Gondi
2. (Peoples) a member of one of the aboriginal races of India, pushed south by the Indo-Europeans and now mixed with them
adj
3. (Peoples) denoting, belonging to, or relating to this family of languages or these peoples
4. (Languages) denoting, belonging to, or relating to this family of languages or these peoples

Dra•vid•i•an

(drəˈvɪd i ən)

n.
1. a language family of South Asia, spoken mainly in S India, and including Telugu and Tamil.
2. a speaker of a language belonging to this family.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to Dravidian or its speakers.
[1856; < Skt Draviḍ(a) ethnonym]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dravidian - a member of one of the aboriginal races of India (pushed south by Caucasians and now mixed with them)Dravidian - a member of one of the aboriginal races of India (pushed south by Caucasians and now mixed with them)
Indian - a native or inhabitant of India
Badaga - a member of an agricultural people of southern India
Gadaba - a member of an agricultural people in southeastern India
Gond - a member of a formerly tribal people in south central India
Canarese, Kanarese - a member of a Kannada-speaking group of people living chiefly in Kanara in southern India
Kolam - a member of a formerly tribal people now living in south central India
Kota, Kotar - a member of the Dravidian people living in the Nilgiri Hills in southern India
Kui - a member of the Dravidian people living in southeastern India
Malto - a member of the Dravidian people living in northern Bengal in eastern India
Savara - a member of the Dravidian people living in southern India
Tamil - a member of the mixed Dravidian and Caucasian people of southern India and Sri Lanka
Telugu - a member of the people in southeastern India (Andhra Pradesh) who speak the Telugu language
Toda - a member of a pastoral people living in the Nilgiri Hills of southern India
Tulu - a member of a Dravidian people living on the southwestern coast of India
2.Dravidian - a large family of languages spoken in south and central India and Sri Lanka
natural language, tongue - a human written or spoken language used by a community; opposed to e.g. a computer language
South Dravidian - a Dravidian language spoken primarily in southern India
South-Central Dravidian - a Dravidian language spoken primarily in south central India
Central Dravidian - a Dravidian language spoken primarily in central India
North Dravidian - a Dravidian language spoken primarily in eastern India
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Aryans and Dravidians," head of Sanskrit Department Ramesh Bhardwaj told M AIL T ODAY .
He begins with an unusual approach, the merchandise mortality and poetics of Aryans, Dravidians, and Israelites.
The Dravidians were originally supposed to have evolved in the continent of lemuria in the Indian ocean.
Risley, for instance, considers the Dravidians (11) to be the original inhabitants of India.
In the political arena he also decided to oppose the "expansion of the Hindi culture" in Tamil Nadu and started the demand for a separate homeland for the Dravidians in the south.
Dravidians form the predominant ethno-linguistic group in southern India and the northern and eastern regions of Sri Lanka.
The conference, this year, will focus on Dravidians art, culture, literature and civilisation.
Indians consist of three races - Dravidians, Aryans and we in the northeast, Lalthanhawla said.
Muller's legacy is uncritical acceptance by generations of scholars who perpetuated his story: Aryans invaded India in 1500 BC and conquered the indigenous people commonly designated as the Dravidians.