drawbridge

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draw·bridge

 (drô′brĭj′)
n.
A bridge that can be raised or drawn aside either to prevent access or to permit passage beneath it.

drawbridge

(ˈdrɔːˌbrɪdʒ)
n
(Civil Engineering) a bridge that may be raised to prevent access or to enable vessels to pass

draw•bridge

(ˈdrɔˌbrɪdʒ)

n.
a bridge of which the whole or a section may be raised, lowered, or drawn aside, to prevent access or to leave a passage open for boats, barges, etc.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drawbridge - a bridge that can be raised to block passage or to allow boats or ships to pass beneath itdrawbridge - a bridge that can be raised to block passage or to allow boats or ships to pass beneath it
bridge, span - a structure that allows people or vehicles to cross an obstacle such as a river or canal or railway etc.
Translations
جِسْر مُتَحَرِّك
padací most
vindebro
felvonóhíd
vindubrú
padací most
açılıp kapanabilen asma köprü

drawbridge

[ˈdrɔːbrɪdʒ] Npuente m levadizo

drawbridge

[ˈdrɔːbrɪdʒ] npont-levis m

drawbridge

nZugbrücke f

drawbridge

[ˈdrɔːˌbrɪdʒ] nponte m levatoio

draw

(droː) past tense drew (druː) : past participle drawn verb
1. to make a picture or pictures (of), usually with a pencil, crayons etc. During his stay in hospital he drew a great deal; Shall I draw a cow?
2. to pull along, out or towards oneself. She drew the child towards her; He drew a gun suddenly and fired; All water had to be drawn from a well; The cart was drawn by a pony.
3. to move (towards or away from someone or something). The car drew away from the kerb; Christmas is drawing closer.
4. to play (a game) in which neither side wins. The match was drawn / We drew at 1–1.
5. to obtain (money) from a fund, bank etc. to draw a pension / an allowance.
6. to open or close (curtains).
7. to attract. She was trying to draw my attention to something.
noun
1. a drawn game. The match ended in a draw.
2. an attraction. The acrobats' act should be a real draw.
3. the selecting of winning tickets in a raffle, lottery etc. a prize draw.
4. an act of drawing, especially a gun. He's quick on the draw.
ˈdrawing noun
(the art of making) a picture made with a pencil, crayon etc. the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci; I am no good at drawing.
drawn adjective
1. (of curtains) pulled together or closed. The curtains were drawn, although it was still daylight.
2. (of a game etc) neither won nor lost. a drawn match.
3. (of a blade etc) pulled out of its sheath. a drawn sword.
4. (of a person) strained and tired. His face was pale and drawn.
ˈdrawback noun
a disadvantage. There are several drawbacks to his plan.
ˈdrawbridge noun
a bridge (at the entrance to a castle) which can be pulled up or let down.
ˈdrawing-pin noun
(American ˈthumbtack) a pin with a broad, flat head used for fastening paper to a board etc.
ˈdrawstring noun
a cord threaded through the top of a bag etc for closing it.
draw a blank
to be unsuccessful in a search, inquiry etc.
draw a conclusion from
to come to a conclusion after thinking about (what one has learned). Don't draw any hasty conclusions from what I've said!
draw in
(of a car etc) to come to a halt at the side of the road.
draw the line
to fix a limit especially for what one is prepared to do.
draw/cast lots
to decide who is to do etc something by drawing names out of a box etc. Five of us drew lots for the two pop-concert tickets.
draw off
to pour out (liquid) from a large container. The barman drew off a pint of beer.
draw on
to use (money, strength, memory etc) as a source. I'll have to draw on my savings.
draw on
1. to pull on. He drew on his gloves.
2. to come nearer. Night drew on.
draw out
1. to take (money) from a bank. I drew out $40 yesterday.
2. to make longer. We drew out the journey as much as we could but we still arrived early.
3. (of a car etc) to move into the middle of the road from the side.
draw up
1. (of a car etc) to stop. We drew up outside their house.
2. to arrange in an acceptable form or order. They drew up the soldiers in line; The solicitor drew up a contract for them to sign.
3. to move closer. Draw up a chair!
4. to extend (oneself) into an upright position. He drew himself up to his full height.
long drawn out
going on for a long time. The meeting was long drawn out; a long-drawn-out meeting/scream.
References in classic literature ?
Before it came the scow schooners, wing-and-wing, blowing their horns for the drawbridges to open.
Each barbican was portcullised, while the inner gates were similarly safeguarded in addition to the drawbridges which, spanning the moat when lowered, could be drawn up at the approach of an enemy, effectually stopping his advance.
On arriving before the battlements, I found the Union Jack flying and the drawbridge up; but undeterred by this show of defiance and resistance, I rang at the gate, and was admitted in a most pacific manner by the Aged.
The latest tenants of the Manor House had, however, with characteristic energy, set this right, and the drawbridge was not only capable of being raised, but actually was raised every evening and lowered every morning.
Here he began to thunder with his axe upon the gate of the castle, protected in part from the shot and stones cast by the defenders by the ruins of the former drawbridge, which the Templar had demolished in his retreat from the barbican, leaving the counterpoise still attached to the upper part of the portal.
There is a saying that if a stranger will pass over the drawbridge and walk across the court to the castle front without saying anything, he can made a wish and it will be fulfilled.
There was an exchange of bugle blasts; then a parley from the walls, where men-at-arms, in hauberk and morion, marched back and forth with halberd at shoulder under flapping banners with the rude figure of a dragon displayed upon them; and then the great gates were flung open, the drawbridge was lowered, and the head of the cavalcade swept forward under the frowning arches; and we, following, soon found ourselves in a great paved court, with towers and turrets stretching up into the blue air on all the four sides; and all about us the dismount was going on, and much greeting and ceremony, and running to and fro, and a gay display of moving and intermingling colors, and an altogether pleasant stir and noise and confusion.
The drawbridge was down, and the duty of the day was about being entered upon.
At the door were standing two young women, girls of the district as they call them, on their way to Seville with some carriers who had chanced to halt that night at the inn; and as, happen what might to our adventurer, everything he saw or imaged seemed to him to be and to happen after the fashion of what he read of, the moment he saw the inn he pictured it to himself as a castle with its four turrets and pinnacles of shining silver, not forgetting the drawbridge and moat and all the belongings usually ascribed to castles of the sort.
At Walnut Grove, bustling with life, the few Americane consisted of the storekeeper, the saloonkeeper, the butcher, the keeper of the drawbridge, and the ferryman.
On their reaching the courtyard he instinctively altered his tread, as being in expectation of a drawbridge; and when there was no drawbridge, and he saw the carriage waiting in the open street, he dropped his daughter's hand and clasped his head again.
As they passed over the drawbridge, Alleyne marked the gleam of arms in the embrasures to right and left, and they had scarce set foot upon the causeway ere a hoarse blare burst from a bugle, and, with screech of hinge and clank of chain, the ponderous bridge swung up into the air, drawn by unseen hands.