Drummond of Hawthornden


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Drummond of Hawthornden

(ˈdrʌmənd ɒv ˈhɔːθɔːndən)
n
(Biography) William. 1585–1649, Scottish poet, historian, and royalist pamphleteer
References in classic literature ?
Conversation of Ben Jonson with Drummond of Hawthornden.
The Elizabethan spirit is present but mingled with seventeenth century melancholy in the sonnets and other poems of the Scotch gentleman William Drummond of Hawthornden (the name of his estate near Edinburgh), who in quiet life-long retirement lamented the untimely death of the lady to whom he had been betrothed or meditated on heavenly things.
Chapter 1, for instance, which covers the late sixteenth/ early seventeenth century, usefully explains the origins of the habit of commonplacing drama, looks at the Titus Andronicus passage in the Longleat manuscript, considers William Briton of Kelstone's extracts from Thomas Sackville and Thomas Norton's Gorboduc, turns to Edward Pudsey's Shakespeare extracts and the more wide-ranging extracts of William Drummond of Hawthornden, and addresses a series of other commonplace books while also discussing the appearance of dramatic extracts in plays and the nature of erasable tables.
Yet, although it encompasses the Older literature of Scotland from The Kingis Quair to William Drummond of Hawthornden, The Lily and the Thistle is, by design, not exhaustive: alongside texts which lack French connections, including historiography, and direct translations, Calin excludes those texts whose French influences have been the subject of other critical inquiries, from The Complaynt of Scotland to John of Ireland's Meroure of Wyssdome.
We remember Jonson for his plays, but he told Drummond of Hawthornden that 'Of all his plays he never gained two hundred pounds'.
It irritated his romance-hating contemporary, Ben Jonson, who complained about it to Drummond of Hawthornden, and forced the editor Sir Thomas Hanmer to "correct" it to "Bithynia" in Asia Minor.
Drummond, Williamin fullWilliam Drummond of Hawthornden (b.
These were later published as Conversations, though in the Cambridge edition they are given what seems to be Drummond's own title of Informations to William Drummond of Hawthornden.
In their own time, however, the epithet "metaphysical" was used pejoratively: in 1630 the Scottish poet William Drummond of Hawthornden objected to those of his contemporaries who attempted to "abstract poetry to metaphysical ideas and scholastic quiddities.
The reputation of William Drummond of Hawthornden (1585-1649) as a poet has primarily been based on works published between 1613 and the 1630s.
Vitarva represented Annabella Drummond, Lady Scotstarvit, the wife of Sir John Scot of Scotstarvit, and sister of Drummond of Hawthornden.
1) The Poetical Works of William Drummond of Hawthornden, ed.