Dublin


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Dub·lin

 (dŭb′lĭn)
The capital and largest city of Ireland, in the eastern part of the country on the Irish Sea. Founded by the Norse in the ninth century, it was under English control after 1171. In the 1900s, as Ireland gained its independence, Dublin emerged as a literary and cultural center.

Dub′lin·er n.

Dublin

(ˈdʌblɪn)
n
1. (Placename) the capital of the Republic of Ireland, on Dublin Bay: under English rule from 1171 until 1922; commercial and cultural centre; contains one of the world's largest breweries and exports whiskey, stout, and agricultural produce. Pop: 1 004 614 (2002). Gaelic name: Baile Átha Cliath
2. (Placename) a county in E Republic of Ireland, in Leinster on the Irish Sea: mountainous in the south but low-lying in the north and centre. County seat: Dublin. Pop: 1 122 821 (2002). Area: 922 sq km (356 sq miles)

Dub•lin

(ˈdʌb lɪn)

n.
1. the capital of the Republic of Ireland, in the E part, on the Irish Sea. 422,220.
2. a county in E Republic of Ireland. 1,001,985; 356 sq. mi. (922 sq. km). Co. seat: Dublin.
Irish, Baile Àtha Cliath.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dublin - capital and largest city and major port of the Irish RepublicDublin - capital and largest city and major port of the Irish Republic
Eire, Ireland, Irish Republic, Republic of Ireland - a republic consisting of 26 of 32 counties comprising the island of Ireland; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1921
Dubliner - a resident of Dublin
Translations
Dublino
Dublin
Dublin
Dyflinn
ダブリン
Dublin
Dublin
Dublin

Dublin

[ˈdʌblɪn]
A. NDublín m
B. CPD Dublin Bay prawn Ncigala f

Dublin

[ˈdʌblɪn] nDublinDublin Bay prawn nlangoustine f

Dublin

[ˈdʌblɪn] nDublino f
References in classic literature ?
1,000 of her population (yearly average), Chicago was as constant with her 15 or 17, Dublin with her 48--and so on.
These mails are carried to Dublin by express trains always held in readiness to start; from Dublin they are sent on to Liverpool by the most rapid boats, and thus gain twelve hours on the Atlantic steamers.
Brought up in poverty by his widowed mother, he spent the period between his fourteenth and twentieth years recklessly and without distinction at Trinity College, Dublin.
Having tried nine seasons at Dublin and two at Bath and Cheltenham, and not finding a partner for life, Miss Malony ordered her cousin Mick to marry her when she was about thirty-three years of age; and the honest fellow obeying, carried her off to the West Indies, to preside over the ladies of the --th regiment, into which he had just exchanged.
From the bridge of the Tryapsic, the high place he had gained in the competition of men, he stared at Dublin harbour opening out, at the town obscured by the dark sky of the dreary wind-driven day, and at the tangled tracery of spars and rigging of the harbour shipping.
This correspondence, however, continued a whole year, even all the while the lieutenant was quartered in that town; for which I was contented to pay the tax of being constantly abused in the manner above mentioned by my husband; I mean when he was at home; for he was frequently absent a month at a time at Dublin, and once made a journey of two months to London: in all which journeys I thought it a very singular happiness that he never once desired my company; nay, by his frequent censures on men who could not travel, as he phrased it, without a wife tied up to their tail, he sufficiently intimated that, had I been never so desirous of accompanying him, my wishes would have been in vain; but, Heaven knows, such wishes were very far from my thoughts.
Thence the joyful news had flashed all over the world; a thousand cities, chilled by ghastly apprehensions, sud- denly flashed into frantic illuminations; they knew of it in Dublin, Edinburgh, Manchester, Birmingham, at the time when I stood upon the verge of the pit.
The travellers reached Dublin that day, in time for the boat to England.
was found among some other old books in Trinity College, Dublin, and given to Francis Dujon.
Thank the Lord that's the car from Dublin," he said.
But all they knew about Ireland was that Dublin was on the Liffey.
He never so much as asked me about my fortune or estate, but assured me that when we came to Dublin he would jointure me in #600 a year good land; and that we could enter into a deed of settlement or contract here for the performance of it.