due process

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due process

n.
An established course for judicial proceedings or other governmental activities designed to safeguard the legal rights of the individual.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.due process - (law) the administration of justice according to established rules and principles; based on the principle that a person cannot be deprived of life or liberty or property without appropriate legal procedures and safeguards
group action - action taken by a group of people
legal proceeding, proceeding, proceedings - (law) the institution of a sequence of steps by which legal judgments are invoked
notification, presentment - an accusation of crime made by a grand jury on its own initiative
judicial decision, judgment, judgement - (law) the determination by a court of competent jurisdiction on matters submitted to it
dispossession, legal ouster, eviction - the expulsion of someone (such as a tenant) from the possession of land by process of law
plea - an answer indicating why a suit should be dismissed
demurrer, denial, defence, defense - a defendant's answer or plea denying the truth of the charges against him; "he gave evidence for the defense"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

due process

noun
The state, action, or principle of treating all persons equally in accordance with the law:
Translations

due process

n (Jur)
due process (of law) (US) → ordentliches Gerichtsverfahren
due process of lawordnungsgemäßes Verfahren
References in periodicals archive ?
For more than 100 years, the Supreme Court has used the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to enforce certain rights, characterized as fundamental, against the states, including some, but not all of the specified, or enumerated rights in the Bill of Rights.
In response to Kersch's criticisms, we shall make several clarifications of our project, namely: (1) the character of our synthesis of liberalism and republicanism; (2) our understanding of "ordered liberty" in relation to Justice Cardozo's; (3) our invocation of Justice Harlan's idea of the "rational continuum" of ordered liberty; and (4) our reasons for focusing on the Due Process Clause as a battleground concerning rights, responsibilities, and virtues.
Different standards: States may assert that an employer is subject to a withholding requirement merely by establishing a minimum connection in the taxing state under a Due Process Clause standard.
Not surprisingly, the Supreme Court decided that the government's use false evidence at trial of violated the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.
If determinations similar to the one sustained by the Oregon Supreme Court are not beyond the pale of the Due Process Clause and the Commerce Clause, then just exactly what protection does the Constitution provide?
However, this law was struck down by the Supreme Court and they found it violated the Fourteenth Amendment's Due Process Clause as interpreted in Roe v.
For as central as the Due Process Clause has been to constitutional law over the last century, the inconsistency of Griswold v.
dissenting), that "[i]t is now the settled doctrine of this Court that the Due Process Clause embodies a system of rights based on moral principles so deeply imbedded in the traditions and feelings of our people as to be deemed fundamental to a civilized society.
This refinement of due process doctrine is necessary to ensure that members of due process subgroups-and not just average or typical individuals--are afforded the fundamentally fair procedural protections guaranteed by the Due Process Clause.
derived from the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment (32) and
The court also determined that for purposes of the Due Process Clause, the plaintiffs purposefully directed their activities toward New York, and it was reasonable to require the plaintiffs to collect taxes for New York.