Dunciad


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Dunciad

 a world of fools, 1728.
References in classic literature ?
Mr Pope, however, very luckily found them in the said play, and, laying violent hands on his own property, transferred it back again into his own works; and, for a further punishment, imprisoned the said Moore in the loathsome dungeon of the Dunciad, where his unhappy memory now remains, and eternally will remain, as a proper punishment for such his unjust dealings in the poetical trade.
But in Pope's own day the Dunciad called forth cries of anger and revenge from the victims, and involved the author in still more quarrels.
Isolating Fielding, just as he would have wished, from his place in the melee of hack-romancers, Power instead traces the classical origins of mock-epic in a series of Scriblerian works, including Jonathan Swift's Tale of a Tub, John Gay's Trivia, and Alexander Pope's Rape of the Lock and The Dunciad, some of which are rather loosely related to the overarching argument of the book.
In his modern Dunciad the chien mechant of Trinity College would say to scholars as well as to readers of his poetry, "Terence, this is stupid stuff" (Shropshire 62).
Throughout The Rape of the Whisker, Squib mimics the apparatus whereby the scholar demonstrates the breadth of his knowledge and his perceptiveness--or, of course, as Pope ruthlessly satirizes in The Dunciad, the pedant exposes his ignorance.
One considers paper, ink and achievement in terms of three bibliopoles; and the unending Dunciad as Pope's weird revenge.
Who wrote satires The Dunciad and The Rape Of The Lock?
Similarly, in The Dunciad, "Science groans in chains" (IV.
In his footnotes to The Dunciad (1728-1743) Pope explicitly called attention to lines he patterned after Milton's in sections he headed "Imitations," kindly pointed out to me by my colleague David Vander Meulen.
While her cultural efforts aroused some criticism and mockery--she was characterised by Alexander Pope at his most waspish, in The Dunciad, as the Queen of Dulness--on the whole her efforts to establish the philanthropic nature of the monarchy, for example by opening her gardens to the polite public, were well-received.
Chapter six makes an in-depth exploration of The Dunciad, which is one of the last pieces of work produced by Pope.
In his collected writings, the literary allusions range from the physics of Lucretius's De Rental Natura through Pope's Dunciad to the metaphysics of Heideggerian time.