dybbuk

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dyb·buk

 (dĭb′o͝ok, dē-bo͞ok′)
n. pl. dyb·buks or dyb·buk·im (dĭ-bo͝ok′ĭm, dē′bo͞o-kēm′)
In Jewish folklore, the wandering soul of a dead person that enters the body of a living person and controls his or her behavior.

[Yiddish dibek, from Hebrew dibbūq, probably from dābaq, to cling; see dbq in Semitic roots.]

dybbuk

(ˈdɪbək; Hebrew diˈbuk)
n, pl -buks or -bukkim (Hebrew -buˈkim)
(Judaism) Judaism (in the folklore of the cabala) the soul of a dead sinner that has transmigrated into the body of a living person
[from Yiddish dibbūk devil, from Hebrew dibbūq; related to dābhaq to hang on, cling]

dyb•buk

(ˈdɪb ək)

n.
(in Jewish folklore) a demon, or the soul of a dead person, that enters the body of a living person and directs the person's conduct, exorcism being possible only by a religious ceremony.
[1900–05; < Yiddish]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dybbuk - (Jewish folklore) a demon that enters the body of a living person and controls that body's behavior
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
daemon, daimon, demon, devil, fiend - an evil supernatural being